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Full text of "Pilgrim"

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THE 

PILGRIM 




Published by the 

PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

Plymouth, Mass. 




cdDedicat 



Ion 



vJn the banks of Uown VSrooh the \^ilanmi concluded with rPfassasoit 
a treaty which brought peace and Safely to the colony for a period of fifty -five 
years. J^o they were able to survive the hardships, famine, disease, ana dangers 
of the firit yean in a new land — to make /■Plymouth the birthplace of our nation. 

il/lany timed iince then men nave laid down their lives to preserve our 
democracy. vs>ul at no time in our history have we had a finer opportunity to 
give meaning to the principles for which /key fought than is ours today. 



l/Ue dedicate this booh to the coming of f^eace. 



I ait we administer what 



these men have gained for us with intelligence and integrity. 



* 



Harold Anthony 
Ernest E. Armes 
Louis Babini 
Idore Benati 
Marks J. Brenner 
Howard Cleveland 
Anthony Crescenza 
Emore P. Dallasta 
Phillip Davis 
Guy DeTrani 
Antone C. Dias 
Manuel Dias 
Alberto Emerson 
George J. Francis 
Robert J. Francis 
Gilbert Freeman 



Henry Fry, Jr. 
Thomas E. Fugazzi 
Albert Gilli 
William B. Gilman 
William H. Given 
William Goodwin 
Ario R. Gould 
Stewart E. Hatch 
Robert J. Hodgen, Jr. 
Donald Hughes 
Vernon E. Kirkey 
Francis Kritzmacher 
Bernard Lahey 
Paul E. Loeber 
James F. Mansfield 



Harold Morelli 
Fred E. Morton 
George A. Nickerson 
William E. O'Connell 
Bernard R. Parker 
Albert E. Poirier 
Caesar Reggiani 
Amerigo Scagliarini 
Leroy Schreiber 
Joseph Sirrico 
Arthur Solieri 
John E. Spurr 
Warren P. Strong 
Antone Sylva 
Chandler Weeks 
Henry E. Wood 



March 31. 1943 




Feace — Ours To Preserve 



1945 - VL Pilqrim Stall -1946 



Editor-in-Chief ---- Marjorie Radcliffe 

Senior Literary Editor -------------- Lillian Parker 

Junior Literary Editor ------ Pauline Armstrong 

Sophomore Literary Editor ------------- Walter Correa 

Business Manager ---... Robert Silva 

r Hilda Belcher 

a ■ . . t-, • ™ Enzo Monti 

Assistant Business Managers ---------- ^ Carlton boudreau 

[_ Marjorie Russell 

Boys' Sports ---- _-.. George Martin 

Girls' Sports ----------------- Catherine Brigida 

Art Editor - _... Dolores Ghidoni 

Assistant Art Editor - Charles Mathewson 

French Editor ---------------- Carolyn Trufant 

Assistant French Editor - -- -- Eva Paoletti 

Latin Editor - Sylvia Bolotin 

Assistant Latin Editor ._____._ Marjorie Nickerson 

Ch. Raymond Girard 

Harriet Douglas 

Barbara Cavicchi 

Richard Buttner 

Richard Correa 

Christine Axford 



Senior Features 



Senior Quatrains 



Ch. Ruth VanAmburgh 

Ina Zall 

Robert Smiley 

Francis Verre 

Ann Stratton 

Candid Camera ------- .___ Elston Bartlett 

Assistant Candid Camera --__._ James Lamborghini 

Tvoists ------------ JThelma Bourne 

yp \ Ann Kennedy 

School News ------- ..____ j OAN Holmes 

Assistant School News -------- Katherine Palches 

Distribution ------------------ Harold Young 



Page 4 



J, 



n l v emonam 




^4n5on VD. ^r4andi 



Superintendent of Schools 



'/ 



f-^iumouth, rlflaiSachuietti 



1926-1941 



lA/ith him ii utiidom and 
ilrenqth; he hath counsel 
and understandinq. 



Page 5 



Prayer for Peace 



Words by 

Rullo VatfAmburgrb 



Music by 
Ger-lrade- Mem if 



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With peace-- ful day.s neatb trao quil SKieS. 

And men a, -grain can See* -for npht. 

Pre^ - Serv - m^ peace- -for al^ to fit^re. 

b~i" , » m — *- 



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Pagre 6 





SENIORS 



Page 7 




Page 8 



d-Sioaraph 



arapi 



ica 




KENNETH TELFER 

The president of the Class of '46 has led our meetings 
for the last three years, and has been with us since the 
ninth grade when he came to Plymouth from Carver. He 
is a fellow of a few words but has won himself recognition 
as left end on the football team, and is an active member 
of the Student Activities Society. Everybody likes "Ken- 
ny," but his classmates will long remember him for his 
original sneeze. He plans to enter Northeastern, and we 
know he will be the credit to the college that he has been to Plymouth High. 




HENRY FERRARI 

In every class there are some who seem to enjoy the 
business of living, and Henry, our vice-president, is one 
of those people. He has served as homeroom president 
both in his sophomore and junior years. He is an active 
member of the Student Activities Society, and has par- 
ticipated in sports as guard on the football squad. Henry 
hopes to be a dentist. If he opens an office in Plymouth, 
he may be in a position to afford us both pleasure and 
pain in the days to come. 




PAULINE ZANELLO 

Pauline has quietly done much to win our admiration 
and affection. In her sophomore and senior years she 
served as homeroom secretary, and since her junior year 
she has acted as class secretary. Apparently the Class of 
'46 likes a good-looking blonde with blue eyes and a win- 
ning smile to record the minutes of its meetings. Pauline 
has been a stamp collector and rendered service on dance 
committees. She wishes to become a medical secretary. 




NORMAN CLARK 

"Clarky," the class treasurer, is a member of the 
basketball team and has scored many a point for the 
school. Although unpretentious and studious, during his 
three years in high school he has always been willing to 
cooperate on dance committees. Norman also has been 
in assembly programs, and we well remember his last 
appearance as the Reverend Clark at Thanksgiving. 
Norman's scholastic record has been such that he is a 

member of the Honor Group. The service will gain another Plymouth boy 

after graduation since he intends to enter the Navy. 




Page 9 



V jo record kern of tkinas tkeu ue done; 



l/l/e oniu seek to have some fvrn. 



EARL ALEXANDER 

He's the kind of craftsman 

With whom we can't com- 
pete 

As he constructs distinctive 
toys 

At his shop on Alden Street. 



GERTRUDE ALVES 

Gertie sings her little songs 
Now low, now sweet, now 

hot— 
At basketball or hockey 

games 
She's always on the spot. 



MARY ANDREWS 

Quiet, unassuming, 

In a pleasant way 

She performs with diligence 

The duties of the day. 



GEORGE AVERY 

We obtained proof positive 
Of his vocal power — 
He really barked and bel- 
lowed 
In the Theatre Hour. 




CHRISTINE AXFORD 

Her classroom teachers, we 

are sure, 
Must entertain some doubt: 
Is she really able 
To life her voice and shout? 



BARBARA BAGNI 

For most distinguished serv- 
ice 
To her school and class 
We pronounce a benison 
Upon this able lass. 



GENEVIEVE BAKER 

Genevieve, sweet Genevieve, 
Off to Boston she blithely 

goes 
On week-end excursions to 

attend 
The city's best movies and 

shows. 



JOHN BANKER 

Applause and hosannas 
To a football captain who 
Hated to stop playing 
Though the game was 
through. 



Page 10 



ELSTON BARTLETT 

If you'd have no record 
Of the sillier things you do, 
Just be sure his camera's 

eye 
Isn't trained on you. 



HILDA BELCHER 

The range of her activities 

Knocks us for a loop: 

She played the part of half 

a cow — 
Then made the Honor 

Group. 



ROBERT BOLDUC 

He departed from our ranks 
Before his graduation; 
The U. S. Navy will provide 
His higher education. 



SYLVIA BOLOTIN 

With Caesar, Cicero, Vergil 
She skillfully contends, 
But her spirit is not mar- 
tial— 
They are the best of friends. 



GEORGE BONZAGNI 

For all we know to the con- 
trary, 

His cakes and pies are deli- 
cious : 

That his milkshakes are the 
tops 

Is no tale fictitious. 




LOUISE BORGHESANI 

She knows that smiles pay 

dividends 
More liberal than frowns, 
That they can smooth the 

pathway 
O'er life's ups and downs. 



PAULINE BOTIERI 

She never gets mired 
In morasses of gloom — 
In the sunlight of smiles 
Her good nature blooms. 



THELMA BOURNE 

Music on her lips, 
Rhythm in her feet, 
Prove a combination 
With which we can't com- 
pete. 



ANN BOUTIN 

She flits here, she darts 

there 
Like a hummingbird; 
You hope to catch her in 

repose? 
How utterly absurd ! 



CATHERINE BRIGIDA 

Always willing to assist 
In whatever way she's able, 
"Most cooperative and cour- 
teous" — 
For Cathy that's our label. 



Page 11 



THERESE BROULLARD 

Lest effort should go unre- 
warded 

We feel that all should know 

She worked long hours in 
our library — 

A debt to her we owe. 



HAROLD BUMPUS 

Santos Dumont is the man 
Admired by Harold Bum- 
pus; 
If his idol we deride 
He will raise a rumpus. 



JACQUELINE BURGESS 

Foolish it is to act in haste 

And then at leisure rue it; 

Deliberately she makes a 
plan 

And then proceeds to pur- 
sue it. 



JAMES BUTTERS 

No man can have every- 
thing : 

It may be that he had his 
share, 

For he served as basketball 
captain 

And as a football player. 



RICHARD BUTTNER 

A farmer once he thought 

he'd be, 
But he's had a change of 

heart : 
As an engineer in this vale 

of tears 
He'll seek to do his part. 




SHIRLEY CARAMELLO 

Shirley, Shirley you look 

fine — 
No need now to preen 
Before your locker mirror; 
It's really 8:14. 



BARBARA CAVICCHI 

With interests so numerous 
And responsibilities myriad 
She doubtless feels she must 

relax 
In second study period. 



MARY CERCELLO 

Those who sit in her home 

room 
Have observed with some 

dismay 
That they must wait for the 

notices 
Till she has had her say. 



NORMAN CLARK 

English and history silence 
him, 

To his way of thinking 
they're rather grim: 

With physics and math he'll 
cast his fate, 

On tangents and laws ex- 
patiate. 



REGINALD CORREA 

We haven't had the training 
To interpret what it means: 
He has divergent interests — 
Music and machines. 



Page 12 



RICHARD CORREA 

Snowdrop and pussywillow, 
Robin's blithe call — he 

awaits all: 
Not that he's a naturalist— 
But he just loves baseball. 




HILDA COSTA 

Tempus fugit — 
But does she care? 
It's twelve past eight 
When she's in her chair. 



JEANETTE COVELL 

Chatter, chatter, chatter — 
Garrulous is this lass: 
She dispenses all the news 
In the corridor after class. 



JACQUELINE DeCARLI 

Jackie's work is never done. 
She toils from morn to set 

of sun. 
Though Caesar and Cicero 

have been completed, 
She cannot rest till Vergil's 

defeated. 




Ak^w 



ROBERT DIEGOLI 

We know that tin does not 
possess 

The properties of elastic — 

But the number of passen- 
gers he transports 

Is utterly fantastic. 



HARRIET DOUGLAS 

She has a magic formula 
For combining work and 

play, 
Which has stood her in 

good stead 
On life's Rocky way. 



LOIS EAMES 

Life is earnest, life is real, 
No time for vapid chatter — 
In this workaday world of 

ours 
It's deeds — not words — that 

matter. 



DOROTHY ENGLISH 

The sixty-four dollar ques- 
tion 

We shall now propound: 

Will she or won't she turn 
on the charm? 

It depends on who's around. 



HENRY FERRARI 

We have heard some tall 

tales 
And told some in our time — 
But the one about him and 

a lady's nose 
Is our idea of prime. 



Page 13 



MABEL FERREIRA 

She's not the one who will 

rush in 
Where angels fear to tread: 
Carefully she looks about — 
Then takes a step ahead. 



MARGARET FILLEBROWN 

Of little brother's escapades 
She tells at our behest: 
She keeps us all in stitches 
And fills our days with zest. 



ALDO FORNACIARI 

For the ills of the world 
There's no panacea: 
But for our duller moments 
His name spells good cheer. 



LIONEL FORTINI 

We thought he would bs 

missing 
From the graduation dance, 
But on the draft expiring 
He thought he'd take a 

chance. 



DONALD GALLERANI 

It may seem to some 
Most picayune — 
But what he wants most 
Is the middle of June. 




JOHN GHELLI 

Through the pre - com- 
mencement weeks 

He lives with the calm as- 
surance 

That schooldays won't last 
forever — 

All he needs now is endur- 
ance. 



DOLORES GHIDONI 
Many endless hours she 

spent 
Under Mrs. Brown's direc- 
tion 
That her contributions to us 
Might approach perfection. 



RAYMOND GIRARD 

Upon Annapolis he cast 
A speculative eye: 
Wherever he matriculates 
His record will be high. 



HAROLD GOVONI 

An appendix operation 
Anyone can bear; 
It was the timing of it 
That made him tear his 
hair. 



ROBERT GRIFFITH 

He's never been known 
To grumble and groan 
At ills that have whacked us 
And tasks that have cracked 
us. 



Page 14 



BETTY GROZINGER 

Sundaes and sodas 
Most girls would abjure 
If a trim figure like hers 
'T would ensure. 



BARBARA GUNTHER 

In the superintendent's of- 
fice 
Or on the hockey field 
For honest application 
To no one she need yield. 



SHIRLEY HAIRE 

She's busy as an office girl 
Both while in school and 

out. 
Her thoughts of Brooklyn 

Navy Yard 
Locked behind barriers 

stout. 



ROBERT HAND 

He grabs his good shillelagh 
And rushes in with glee 
If, perchance, our poor idea 
With his does not agree. 



ROBERT HOKANSON 

He's intimated more than 
once 

That school brings no ela- 
tion: 

We thought just being with 
us 

Would be some compensa- 
tion. 




JOAN HOLMES 

She takes pride in achieve- 
ment, 

But she's free from conceit — 

One of the most pleasant 
girls 

It's been our luck to meet. 



ROSCOE HOLMES 

Hunting comes first 
In this man's life. 
For Rocky's not happy 
Without gun and knife. 



LAWRENCE JOHNSON 

Here is a subject 
On which we'd throw light: 
He possesses a bark 
Much worse than his bite. 



HERBERT KEARSLEY 

Herbie has a little Ford, 
Its paint is black as pitch— 
And it alone prevents him 
From being very rich. 



ANN KENNEDY 

As typist for the yearbook 
She worked with great dis- 
patch 
Faithfully and busily 
To finish each new batch. 



Page 15 



MELVIN KLASKY 

On the era of the Civil War 
Whenever he gets the nod, 
He recites with such profi- 
ciency — 
His classmates are over- 
awed. 



AGNES KNIGHT 

The finest scarecrow we've 

seen yet, 
But no offense, you know — 
For that's the part that 

Agnes had 
In the Garden Gaieties 

show. 



EVELYN LEXNER 

The idea surely isn't one 
That we would here dis- 
parage : 
She thinks of her diploma 
As prerequisite to marriage. 



ELAINE LONGHI 

You must have observed 
Who is bandbox neat 
From the top of her head 
To the soles of her feet. 



GERALDINE LOVELL 

She promotes the general 

welfare 
More than we may have 

thought: 
If teachers didn't get their 

lunch, 
Their tempers might be 

short. 




ROBERTA LOVELL 

To school she brings a pic- 
ture 

And displays it with pride 
and joy, 

Who's the object of her af- 
fections? 

It's her sister's baby boy. 



GEORGE MARINOS 

The Honor Roll is this boy's 

goal, 
And he makes it with little 

ado — 
But let the teacher leave 

the room 
And his serious air goes, too. 



ALBERT MARSH 

"Swampy" pulls his lobster 

pots 
During the summer season: 
For not to fish in Ellisville 
Would be considered 

treason. 



GEORGE MARTIN 

He has an air of assurance, 
But we would not berate it — 
For he also has the record 
To substantiate it. 



ALICE MATINZI 

When we ask of her a favor, 
She will readily reply 
That, if it lies within her 

power, 
Our wish she'll not deny. 



Page 16 



EDWARD MELLO 

Gargantuan grin 
When things go right 
Is replaced by a frown 
When things look less 
bright. 



HENRY MENGOLI 

Henry is a studious lad, 
But, if excitement's to be 

had, 
If merriment is in the air, 
He'll contribute his just 

share. 



GERTRUDE MERRITT 

Life won't be so difficult 
At work or play or in school 
If we accept her formula 
And live by the Golden Rule. 



ENZO MONTI 

As sure as we are of taxes 
We are sure of this: 
Enzo in glasses and derby 
Is a sight no one should 



MARJORIE MORTON 

She has evinced a preference 

For the opposite sex — 

We choose our words most 

guardedly 
For her we would not vex. 




LYDIA MOTTA 

Girl rushes to locker. 
We hope she's not late, 
For there she will meet him 
At ten minutes past eight. 



TINA MOTTA 

In school she's as quiet 
As quiet can be — 
But when on the dance floor 
She's something to see. 



MARILYN NICHOLS 

A doodler par excellence 
With pencil, chalk, or pen: 
Her sketches are diverting, 

rare — 
A true artist is Miss N. 



MARGARET OGG 

It is sometimes advantage- 
ous 

To be taller than the rest, 

For, though you sometimes 
bump your head, 

The view up there is best. 



LILLIAN PARKER 

A happy face, a flashing 

smile, 
And personality plus — 
She warms the cockles of 

our heart 
The hours she spends with 

us. 



Page 17 



BETTY PEDERZINI 

She isn't always 
Sweetness and light — 
She lets us know it 
When things don't go right. 



LOIS PERRY 

Where is the fire? 
Why the mad speed? 
She's off to the Cordage — 
She pays us no heed. 



LOUISE POIRIER 

She has a face and figure 
Well above the norm: 
The Class of '46 presents 
Its anatomical bomb. 

J 



ROBERT POTTER 

He takes Home Ec, so doubt- 
less knows 

A meal's not cooked in the 
parlor : 

But could he possibly pre- 
pare it 

Ab ovo usque ad mala. 



ROBERT QUERZE 

Let's have a place for every- 
thing 
And everything in its place: 
Sloppiness, it seems to him, 
Verges on disgrace. 




MARJORIE RADCLIFFE 

Shortages reared their ugly 
heads, 

There were deadlines to be 
met — 

So numerous were her head- 
aches 

That she's not recovered 
yet. 



THOMAS REAGAN 

From the tip of his tongue 
Pour forth diatribes: 
But no harm is meant 
By his maddening jibes. 



WALTER REID 
blow 



your 



Come, Walter, 

trumpet — 
Let us hear it wail and cry: 
Give a little — and you can 
Drown out Besegai. 



ALAN ROBERTS 

No matter what the ques- 
tion, 
Alan's hand is first to rise — 
And in matters scientific 
Mr. Roberts takes the prize. 



ROSE ROGERS 

Rosie is a diminutive miss 

With a wide and friendly 
smile ! 

Her equilibrium she main- 
tains 

When people tease and rile. 



Page 18 



PHYLLIS ROWE 

Some seniors are impatient 
With the smaller fry: 
But she is sympathetic to 
Their eternal how and why. 



AURORA SA 

Aurora was discussed 
In our poet's forum: 
We found her the epitome 
Of feminine decorum. 



IRVING SADOW 

It may be knowledge that 
he seeks, 

But his method we deplore: 

Of these whispered conver- 
sations 

We will have no more. 



WINIFRED SANDERSON 

Although she may seem reti- 
cent, 
When you know her well, 
About a certain Navy lad 
She will proudly tell. 



BARBARA SAWYER 

To a man in the Navy 
She's plighted her troth: 
The finest of voyages 
Is our wish for both. 




PAUL SCHEID 

Somewhat on the quiet side 

We feel satisfied 

Until, "You just don't know 

him," 
Laughing friends deride. 



ARTHUR SHAW 

That there is no write-up of 

his sport 
In the year book is high 

treason ! 
It's just that it must go to 

press 
Before the baseball season. 



HAROLD SHERMAN 

It may be that 
He's circumspect: 
No blot on his record 
Can we detect. 



CHARLES SIEVER 

When, his ambition realized, 
He's admitted to the bar, 
We'll all insist we always 

knew 
That Charlie would go far. 



&<^ 




EVELYN SIL 

We caftnot ftrage by stature 
The work^tnat 'o^e can (do: 
For Evie's half the ^size* of 

one f j^P~^ 

And does enough for two. 



Page 19 



GILBERT SILVA 

Senior girls can praise or 
censure — 

He will not attend: 

But one junior's mild dis- 
pleasure 

Can his composure rend. 



ROBERT SILVA 

No need of Arthur Murray 

Or lessons from Madame 
Lazonga — 

Already he has the rudi- 
ments 

Of the rhumba and the 
conga. 



ROBERT SMILEY 

Psychology in 301 
Was just the class for Bob. 
He'd talk with ease on any- 
thing 
Prom cars to corn-on-cob. 



NANCY SMITH 

Today she is as pleasant 
As summer breeze in coun- 
try lane; 
Tomorrow she may gusty be 
As a winter hurricane. 



MANUEL SOUZA 

His experience with the bul- 
letin board 

May have done some good: 

Why teachers need wax 
critical 

Is more easily understood. 




PAULINE SPRINGER 

To think her demure 
Is highly fallacious — 
Though we have been 

charged 
With being mendacious. 



RICHARD STAS 

He doesn't like routine him- 
self, 
But he'll be the very one 
To extol its virtues 
To his high school son. 



HENRY STEFANI 

We hope for the best when 

he decides 
That he must have his say: 
But there are topics upon 

which 
He'll expatiate all day. 



ANN STRATTON 

She must constantly battle 

temptation : 
We hope she has what it 

takes 
To think her waistline more 

precious 
Than Currier's candies and 

cakes. 



ANTOINETTE SYLVIA 

She shows some concern 
About her coiffure: 
Though we approve it, 
She's never quite sure. 



Page 20 



MILDRED SWIFT 

Not on one occasion 
But in instances galore 
When Carolyn approaches. 
She shuts their locker door. 



DOLORES TASSINARI 

She lives in a state 
Of perpetual animation, 
And to those about her, 
Transmits her agitation. 



KENNETH TELFER 

As president of '46 
He used no dynamite; 
Yet results that he achieved 
Prove his tactics right. 



RUTH TILLSON 

Long years ago she set her 

course 
For better or for worse: 
She had her tonsils out — 

and knew 
She must become a nurse. 



ROBERT TORRANCE 

Had he lived in Pilgrim days 
One thing he could have 

done: 
Easily he could have proved 
His prowess with a gun. 




CAROLYN TRUFANT 

She walks as proudly 
As any queen — 
But no trace of arrogance 
In her may be seen. 



RUTH VanAMBURGH 

In years to come she'll sadly 

sigh 
And cast a disapproving eye 
On those who to her wend 

their way 
On the night before it's book 

report day. 



FRANCIS VERRE 

We shouldn't be so foolhardy 
As to mention chickens and 

eggs: 
Given the opportunity, 
He'll talk off both our legs. 



RICHARD VITTI 

Sandwiches and apple pie, 
Big grapes by the bunch — 
We look at noon to see what 

he 
Will pull forth from his 

lunch. 



CAROLYN WOOD 

For mass production 
She must give thanks 
So she can wear clothes 
Like Louise's and Hank's. 



Page 21 



INA ZALL 

On days when grades are 

given out 
Be sure she's not forgotten 
To check the mark that she 

received 
With that of S. Bolotin. 



DONALD FECI 

The mysteries of the Orient 

He thought he would ex- 
plore : 

And that's just what he's 
doing 

With the U. S. Marine Corps. 




PAULINE ZANELLO 

I think that I 
May never see 
A girl as capable 
As she. 



ROBERT MILLS 

He left his friends behind 

him 
And donned the navy blue — 
First boot camp down at 

Bainbridge 
And then adventures new. 



MARION ZANIBONI 

How we should miss her 
If we failed to see 
Carrying notices 
Marion Z! 



GLORIA VECCHI 

Upon her we at one time 
Feared we'd lost our hold; 
Now joyously we welcome her 
Back into the fold. 



Bouquets and Brickbats 

Elston Bartlett For being the official candid photographer of 

the school 

Reginald Correa ) For bei the classiest duo 

Robert Querze \ 

Gertrude Alves For being outstanding in athletics 

Robert Griffith For being the solidest senior 

Robert Potter For being the trickiest in boys' gymnastics 

Gertrude Merritt For willingness to play for assemblies 

Kenneth Telfer For being president for three consecutive 

years 

Robert Hand For being the ablest politician in the class 

Ruth Van Amburgh For winning the "Best Girl Citizen" award 

Enzo Monti For being the best actor in the class 

Pepper Martin For being the lone senior to win three letters 

Dolores Ghidoni For being so talented in art 

Marjorie Radcliffe For being able to giggle continuously 

Dorothy English / p r cementing close relations between soph- 

Richard Buttner \ omores and seniors 

Alan Roberts For being the scientific prodigy of the class 



Page 22 



^Jke j^rincipai S^>peak 



PEACE MUST REST ON JUSTICE 




r 



'F THE bickering and contentions of the nations 
of the world were to be stilled by the awful 
voice of Ultimate Authority, and each were 
required to state in one word what it is that is 
wanted, the reply would be: "Justice!" And 
though, in the light of the clashes in the council 
of the U.N.O., that answer may appear to be dis- 
honest and insincere, yet, insofar as it reflects a 
fundamental human yearning and aspiration, it is 
both honest and sincere. 

For most men want no more than justice. 
They are not looking for favors, concessions, or special treatment; they are 
men in the best sense of that word, and they ask no more than that they be 
judged fairly in regard to their deeds, their ambitions, their hopes, and 
their fears. Fairly; let that be emphasized. 

In a social structure such as ours every man at some time or other, in 
one way or another, sits in judgment on his fellowmen. With such in- 
formation as may be available he must make up his mind and reach 
decisions affecting the work, the conditions of life, the moral and physical 
well-being of his fellow citizens. That is part of the duty of all men and 
women in a democracy. In addition to that, in our ordinary daily affairs 
we are constantly analyzing, weighing, evaluating the acts, motives, and 
character of those with whom we come in contact — and in like manner 
we, too, are judged. 

So it behooves us that we be fair in our judgments. The golden rule, 
though old-fashioned, is not yet out of fashion, nor will it ever be. Envy, 
malice, self-interest, prejudice must not enter into our decisions unless we 
are prepared to accept them as dominant factors in the decisions affecting 
us. If we seek justice for ourselves, we can do no less than share it with 
all men, for, if it becomes one man's — or one nation's — private property, 
it ceases to be justice. 

The world today is disturbed, upset; and men live in fear lest war 
engulf them again. And war will come in one form or other if justice be 
denied; that has always been so. Therefore, it becomes the duty of each 
one of us to inform ourselves as thoroughly as we can about the vexing 
problems, national and international, that now are foci of conflict. India, 
Java, Egypt, Russia — the list grows longer and courage flags. Price- 
controls, universal military service, labor-management troubles! These 
we must face; must study. 

Then we must act — with justice. 

Edgar J. Mongan 

Page 23 



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THE! CLASS OF 1946 



Mr 




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" DAY ASSEMBLY OCT '43 
LEAVES JR. HIGH- <H 

HEADS FOR DIPLOMA °0 




STAGGERS TO END 
OF SOPHOMORE YEAR 




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IN 5ENI0R HIGH 





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JAN 4 4 



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ORGANIZED 




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WATCHES THANKS 
GIVING DAY ASSEMBLY 



FIRST SOPH. CLASS 
MEETING MAFVW 

JUNIOR PROM rH> 
MAY '45 



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PROLONGED VACATION 
DUE TO 5CARLET FEVER 






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APRILS ^ CLAS 5 S ME N ETIN6 



SECOND XMAS 
ASSEMBLY IN P.H.S 








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^THOROR SOCIETY YEARBOOK GOES 
0' ^ .« TO PRESS MAR. '45 



SCH00LBO0KS CLOSED 
FOR TWO MONTHS 

>fo SENIOR DANCE 

^ NOV. '45 ^<u 

° n ° n ?S^eS /^ •.«> LOST IN THE" MAIF 

oo j^r^Q, <?£ ^ OF CLASS POEM , COLORS/*. 

&ACKT0 6CH00L_ o ^ M Po° 




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ONE MORE YEAR 



SENIOR 7 \ PICS r>0 
JAN * l ' H6 eT* 



AT LAST/ 



ii i»r«<wtaiM-_ 



Page 27 



Best Girl Citizen 

THIS year marks the tenth time that the National Society of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution has sponsored a Good Citizen 
Pilgrimage among students of graduating classes in the high schools 
all over the country. By vote of the Class of '46, endorsed by the faculty, 
the honor and title of Best Girl Citizen have been bestowed upon Ruth 
VanAmburgh, who possesses to an outstanding degree the qualities of 
dependability, service, leadership, and patriotism. 

Since first entering senior high school Ruth has participated in many 
extra-curricular activities. She served as a Junior Red Cross collector in 
her sophomore year, and for the last two years has been a defense stamp 
treasurer. As a member of the glee club she has taken part in several 
musical programs. Greatly interested in library work, Ruth has served as 
secretary of the library staff for two years. She has assisted on many 
various committees for dances and school productions. In the literary field 
she has displayed her interest and ability as a member of the Press Club 
and the chairman of the quatrain committee for The Pilgrim. 

Having been elected to the National Honor Society in her junior year, 
Ruth has been active as a junior member of the Plymouth Woman's Club. 

She has also been a representative to the Student Activities Society and 
a member of the Honor Group. 

The class feels sure that it has done well to name Ruth VanAmburgh 
its Best Girl Citizen. 

Marjorie Radcliffe 



Seniors Say: 



"Never study today what you can put off till 8:15 tomorrow. 
Silence is golden — but a good recitation is platinum. 
Exams come in pairs. 
A good bluff covers a multitude of sins. 
A homelesson is easier lost than found. 
Better late than absent. 

When the pencil is 'borrowed,' shut the locker door. 
A lazy student gathers no A's. 
A teacher may see that a student goes to class, but she cannot make him 

study. 
Many glances are cast in class that the teacher knoweth not of. 
So many heads, so many wits — so many answers! 
Lord, what fools these sophomores be! 
A senior without riches is a senior without a girl. 
Almost caught was never hanged. 

Charity begins in the corridor but should not end there. 
Better a day of sleep than a century of strife. 
Two heads are better than one. 
I cannot sleep a wink — in study. 
A light purse makes a heavy heart. 
A book that is shut is but a block." 

. Page 28 



^Ar6 l/i/e LJnce \A/ere 




Front Row: Catherine Brigida, Enzo Monti, Barbara Bagni, Robert Smiley, Hilda Belcher, Thomas 

Reagan, Evelyn Lexner 
Second Row: Reginald Correa. Mabel Ferreira, Carolyn Wood, Norman Clark, Christine Axford, 

Margaret Fillebrown, Roscoe Holmes 
Third Row: Betty Pederzani, Richard Vitti, Elaine Longhi, Harold Bumpus, Harriet Douglas, 

Richard Buttner, Dolores Tassinari 

Senior Best Sellers 

"Jims Girl" Barbara Gunther 

"Call of the Wild" Robert Smiley 

"Blue Jackets' Manual" Robert Bolduc 

"Excuse My Dust" Herbert Kearsley 

"The Sea Rover" Albert Marsh 

"The Country Doctor" Henry Mengoli 

"Jeeves" Enzo Monti 

"The Halfback" Raymond Girard 

"The Chinese Parrot" Donald Feci 

"Hunger Fighters" Boys' Cooking Class 

"Captain Blood" John Banker 

"Wake Up and Live" Kenneth Telfer 

"How to Raise Chickens" Francis Verre 

"Stick and Rudder" Robert Griffith 

"The Plow and the Share" George Avery 

"Persuasive Peggy" Margaret Fillebrown 

"Microbe Hunters" Alan Roberts 

Page 29 




Page 30 



C/kjJ of '46 lA/uid Sjrodune! 

by Enzo Monti and Francis Verre 

In an exclusive interview with the executors of the estate of the Class 
of 1946, Messrs. Waggone, Waggonne, Waggonne and Carte, it was 
announced that the class had made several munificent bequests. Mr. Carte, 
speaking for the firm, divulged the following list of heirs and legacies: 




Miss Iris Albertini was the 
recipient of a very ingeni- 
ous method of converting 
Room 303 into a cafeteria, 
thus eliminating the vio- 
lent urge on the part of 
her fourth - period study 
pupils to reach the first 
floor first. 




To Miss Eleanor Anifantis 
was left the hope that she 
may some day lead an as- 
sembly when every mem- 
ber knows the words of 
the school song. 




Mrs. Helen Bagnall was 
given an alarm system of 
bells, sirens, and flashing 
lights to be used by her 
classes whenever she strays 
from the subject at hand. 




Mrs. Louise Bearse received 
the services of the Find- 
the - Finer - Finances - First 
Collection Agency to facili- 
tate the locating of and 
collecting from pupils who 
have "Reader's Digest" ar- 
rears. 




Mrs. Margaret Brown was 
left one ( 1 • electronic, 
tamper-proof time-lock for 
her door to keep her very 
scarce paper and paint safe 
from marauding poster 
committees. 




For Mrs. Viola Figueiredo 
Room 106 is to be made 
completely odor - proof so 
that no smells may per- 
meate the corridors to 
tantalizingly tempt unwary 
passers-by. 




A new scoring method has 
been devised for Mrs. Bea- 
trice Garvin. It is hoped 
that the new system will 
bring satisfaction to both 
boys and girls when they 
play volley ball together. 




Mr. Carlo Guidaboni re- 
ceived a can of gold paint 
to be used in applying 
stripes to his pens and 
pencils, so that he will not 
miss too much those that 
were on his sleeve. 




A box of chalk of every 
known color has been as- 
sembled so that Miss Olive 
Hey may draw the inter- 
locking branches of family 
trees, but still keep differ- 
ent ancestries distinct from 
one another. 




For Miss Jeannette Jacques 
there is to be purchased a 
magnificent concert - shell 
complete with 100 - piece 
orchestra, where she may 
more fittingly instruct her 
students in French words 
to "The Marseillaise" and 
"Jingle Bells." 




A complete album of Spike 
Jones records was left to 
Miss Helen Johnson in the 
hope that they may relieve 
the monotony of the type- 
writing record. 




For Miss Lydia Judd there 
is being devised a new 
shorthand system, contain- 
ing only one (1> symbol. 
This should make dictation 
tests easier for her to 
correct and, incidentally, 
simpler for pupils to take. 




To Miss Elizabeth Kelly 
was given a new type 
blackboard that does not 
show colored-chalk adver- 
tisements long after they 
are "washed off." 




Mrs. Bernice Kelly was left 
the hope that she may 
some day have a bass 
drummer who does not 
drown out the rest of the 
band with his reverberat- 
ing thumps. 




4^> 



Miss Katherine Lang re- 
ceived the joyful satisfac- 
tion of knowing that her 
worst "problems of democ- 
racy," her senor pupils, 
have at long last departed. 




For Miss Nellie Locklin was 
designed a room without 
window, telephone, or loud- 
speaker, with a door which 
can be heavily barred, as 
a means of preventing her 
pupils from being called 
out of class. 




Principal Edgar Mongan is 
to be the recipient of a 
student body wise enough 
to know — without learn- 
ing from experience — that 
regulations are not made 
to be broken. 




One of the first 1946 cars 
has been ordered for Mr. 
Theodore Packard to re- 
place the long, sleek, 16- 
cylinder Mercedes he has 
been driving of late. 



•f ~ w 



~ V 



-* 




To Mr. John Pacheco was 
left the hope that he may 
some day find a pupil dar- 
ing enough to play a con- 
tra-bassoon in the orches- 
tra. 




Mr. Arthur Pyle was the 
recipient of 500 Adams 
history books, 35 of which 
must have chains to be 
fastened to the desks so 
that no more books will be 
"missing." 



Page 32 




Mrs. Amy Pratt was given 
the hope that she makes 
as good a housewife as she 
aid a teacher. 




Mrs. Miriam Raymond was 
given a twin to enable her 
to conduct all her classes 
easily and still attend to 
her various committees, 
staffs, consultations and 
divers activities. 



r 

vj ^ IS, 



Mr. Mario Romano was 
left a 14-foot ruler which, 
aside from being helpful in 
measuring long distances, 
will also be convenient in 
admonishing back-seat 
talkers. 




Mr. Louis Rudolph received 
the hope that his next 
playing-field may be closer 
than ours to the school, 
thereby preventing his 
charges from tiring them- 
selves out just by running 
from shower room to field. 




Mr. Richard Smiley was 
given a jar of home-made 
preserves to add variety 
to his shelves of pickled 
cats, fish, spiders, and 
reptiles. 




Mrs. Alice Urann was pre- 
sented with a rope ladder, 
the more quickly to move 
from auditorium to bal- 
cony while directing her 
"precious" Bernhardts and 
Barrymores. 




To Mr. John Walker was 
granted permission to dress 
his football players in cere- 
monial masks or whatever 
souvenirs he may have 
brought back from Okin- 
awa, with a view to scaring 
the opponents to death. 




Miss Margie Wilber was 
bequeathed a case of au- 
thentic Roman togas to 
be worn by her and her 
classes so that her pupils 
may enter into the spirit 
of Latin translations more 
readily. 




To Mr. Claiborne Young 
was bestowed a safari, com- 
plete with jewel - bedecked 
elephants and salaaming 
Indian boys, to help him 
with the innumerable 
books, boxes and bags he 
transports to and from 
school daily. 




Mrs. Ruth Bailey's bequest 
was a fleet of scooters to 
speed her little messengers 
on their ways to distribute 
menus, notices, and sched- 
ules. 



Mr. Carte concluded by announcing that the will would be probated 
some time in June, and that complaints, objections, and thanks would be 

accepted at that time. 



Page 33 



Senior f^oetm f^t 



'u i^ aa 



aae 



A BEAM OF LIGHT 

The velvet darkness of the time of sleep 
Starts the time of work for him who keeps 
The flashing beam bright throughout the 
night. 

The waves' soft rumbling fills the night 
As with tumbling crests of wavering, 

ghostly light 
They crash and shatter against the age- 
old rock. 

Outlined against the half-vague new moon, 

bright, 
Like a shadowy finger tipped with golden, 

glowing light 
Stands a lighthouse, silent and forlorn. 

Its flashing beam cuts the velvet softness 

of the night 
As Sir Galahad's sword flashed in favor 

of the right 
In oft-remembered days of Arthur's court. 

Thus, as it searches the far reaches of the 

sea, 
It throws the warning light so that all 

may be 
Warned away from where the couched 

dangers lie. 

George Avery 



WELCOME, DEAR GUEST 

My sister often comes to spend 

With us a quiet weekend, 

And with her come little parcels of joy — 

Her baby girl and her little boy. 

At dinner we gather round the table 

To eat — that is, if we are able. 

Baby sister must sup early, 

For she is "such a tired girlie." 

Little brother will not wait 

And rushes immediately to his plate. 

Into his chair with a yell and a whoop, 

He knocks the tonic into the soup. 

When scolded, he says his feelings are 

hurt, 
And refuses all food — all, save dessert. 

And then when the darlings must go to 

sleep, 
They trot upstairs without a peep. 
Ah, yes. Without a peep — but with yells 

and screams 
That eventually subside in the land of 

dreams. 
And, after a night of grueling torture, 
Of anguished screams for drinks of water, 
Brother hits sister at five a.m. 
And everyone wakes in the resultant 

mayhem. 
My sister often comes to spend 
With us a "quiet" weekend. 

Enzo Monti 



DAFFODILS 

Under a cloudless azure sky 
Daffodils sway in the vernal breeze, 

Gently ?iodding their golden heads — 
Smiled down upon by benignant trees. 

At a stir of the wind they pertly dance, 
Tossing their heads in saucy glee, 

As if to provoke Old Winter, who sighs 
And surrenders to Spring reluctantly. 

These heralds in suits of emerald green 
Raise to the sky their trumpets of gold, 

Announcing to all the advent of Spring — 
Harbingers winsome, delightful, and 
bold. 

Ruth VanAmburgh 



STORM AT THE BEACH 

The beach was barren, bleak, and gray, 
And I could almost hear it say, 
"What do you want this stormy day, 
Wand' ring aimlessly that way?" 

"Wandering aimlessly? Not I," 

Was my reply. 

"I came to see the sea gulls fly 

While through their plaintive, piercing cry 

I listen to the ocean sigh 

And roar and thunder to the shore, 

Then rush far back to pick up more 

Great force to crash in as before. 

I came to feel the North Wind's might 

And satisfy my appetite 

For thrills that Nature can afford 

To set apart from those she's stored." 

Francis Verre 



Page 34 



The Woman Who Wasn't 

JUDITH ALLEN walked thoughtfully down the dusty road. As always 
when there was composition work to be done for English, she felt low in 
spirits. Soon a short story was due, and of all the devious methods of 
torture that she could suffer, this was the worst. She kicked a stone out of 
her way, and, muttering imprecations on the head of her English teacher, 
turned down the drive that led to her home. 

She ran up the steps of the porch and flew into the house. Her mother 
usually had a suggestion to offer when she needed help, and she certainly 
needed it now. When her mother learned of Judith's difficulties, she said, 
"Dear, why don't you take Rocket and go hunting?" 

Judy's reaction was instantaneous. "Mother! Hunting? I thought 
you'd have a good idea." 

Mrs. Duane replied with a twinkle in her eyes, "I don't mean hunting 
for game, Judy. I mean hunting for a short story." 

"What a super idea," Judith thought, as, dressed in white blouse, brown 
jodphurs, and darker brown boots, she sprinted across the lawn to the barn 
to get Rocket. "Maybe I will find one. Anyway, it's worth a try." 

As she rode along, not paying any particular attention to direction, 
Rocket took it upon himself to turn down a familiar road which led to a 
field behind the old Southwell Farm. When the house had been empty, 
Judy had often taken her books over there and studied on the porch. A new 
neighbor had moved in now, and perhaps this would be a good time to visit 
her. "Who knows," she mused, "I may find a subject for a short story over 
there." 

Her reverie was interrupted by the sound of voices that seemed to 
come from the bushes by the side of the lane. Although they were hardly 
more than a murmur, as she rode by she heard the words, "ice," "Mrs. 
Benton," and "we'll collect later." Then the voices ceased and the sound of 
heavy feet crashing through the brush reached her ears. 

"They certainly must want to get that ice to Mrs. Benton in a hurry," 
murmured Judy as she dismounted to pick some deep-purple violets that 
were growing beside the road. 

When she had finished, she mounted Rocket thinking, "These flowers 
are lovely. I think I'll take them to Mrs. Benton." 

In a few moments horse and rider swept through the shrubs and over 
the stone wall that marked the boundary of the Southwell Farm, into a 
large field. The building at the far end of the field, facing the main road, 
was a typical country farmhouse, weather-beaten and old, with a huge 
barn and red silo and big shade trees on the lawn. 

Judy dismounted under one of these trees, wound the reins around the 
saddle horn, let Rocket graze. Carrying the flowers in her hand, she 
mounted the rickety steps and knocked hesitantly on the door. While she 
waited for an answer, she looked around to see what improvements the new 
owner had made. She noted with distaste the same broken rocker on the 
porch, and the living-room window still shattered. Either the new occupants 
were shiftless or intended to stay only a short time. 

Page 35 



As she waited for the door to be opened, she felt strangely perplexed — 
excited by a feeling difficult to define. "Why, I feel as if the moment that 
door opens I'll be face to face with my short story," thought Judy in 
amazement. 

The instant the door was opened she was jerked rudely back to reality. 
Surely there was no short story here. 

The woman who stood grimly in the doorway was a little above 
average height, and garbed in a print house dress that almost reached 
her ankles. Her whole body from her gray hair to the tops of her old- 
fashioned high shoes exuded a strength that seemed almost masculine, 
altogether eccentric and forbidding. 

"Well?" she demanded sternly. "Don't just stand there. What do 
you want?" 

Judy was startled but, as Mrs. Benton stood facing her with a most 
unneighborly expression, she answered, "I'm Judy Duane, Mrs. Benton, 
and, as I was riding by, I thought I'd stop and give you these flowers I 
picked in the lane." She smiled her friendiest smile and held out the 
flowers. "Won't you take them? They're to welcome you to Weston." 

"Very well," said Mrs. Benton, and without a word of thanks took the 
flowers and started to close the door. 

"There's something queer going on here," thought Judy to herself. "I 
never met anyone so unfriendly. I — don't — quite — know what it is, but 
I'm certainly not leaving this place until I learn more." 

The door had almost closed when Judy suddenly put her hand to her 
head and said, "I'm sorry to bother you, Mrs. Benton, but could I come in 
for a minute and sit down? I don't feel very well — the sun's so hot — I'm 
dizzy — but I think I'll be all right in a few minutes." 

Judy looked so pathetic that Mrs. Benton opened the door and said, 
"Come in, then, and 111 get you a glass of water. No, don't take that chair," 
she commanded as Judy started to sit down. "Sit in that one by the fire- 
place — it's more comfortable." 

Mrs. Benton returned in a few minutes with a glass of water, and, as 
Judy drank it, seated herself in a rocker at the opposite side of the fireplace. 
Judy almost bolted upright. She couldn't believe her eyes! "Oh, golly," she 
thought, "I've got to see her sit down again." 

Mrs. Benton smiled in a chilly fashion. "Do you feel any better?" 

"Yes, very much better, thank you," answered Judy. "Thanks so much 
for letting me come in," she continued quickly as Mrs. Benton started to go 
to the door. "Please don't bother. I can find my way out. You just sit down 
and don't bother about me." 

"Well, all right," replied Mrs. Benton, sitting down again and taking up 
some knitting. 

"It can't be my imagination," thought Judy wildly. "It's happened 
twice. But why — why? It's preposterous! Unbelievable! But I — did — 
see — it!" 

Her mother was seated before the window sewing as Judy came in 
from her ride. They were discussing whether or not to wait dinner for her 

Page 36 



fy f l # 



f! 



'•■5. 






G> 



» 




Photos bv Elston Bartlett, Jr. 



father, who managed a jewelry store in town, when the front door opened. 
Mr. Duane, his face white, burst into the room calling his wife. 

"I'm right here, George," said Mrs. Duane quietly. "What's the matter?" 

"Matter?" he shouted. "Do you know what's happened? Well, I'll tell 
you. $50,000 worth of diamonds has been stolen from the store, that's all." 

"Oh, George!" gasped Mrs. Duane. 

"Oh, George, indeed!" yelled her husband. "And those — those nin- 
compoops of policemen, they call themselves policemen, don't know who did 
it. There have been five robberies within the last two months in the sur- 
rounding towns and they haven't a clue!" 

"Now, George, I'm sure they're doing the best they can," said Mrs. 
Duane soothingly. "You sit down and tell us all about it while I fix you 
a drink." 

"Ice," said Judy suddenly and irrelevantly. 

"Ice?" queried Mr. Duane, "Of course I want ice in it." 

"That isn't what I mean, Dad," laughed Judy. "I meant that diamonds 
are sometimes called ice." 

Mr. Duane looked at Judy as if he thought that she was suddenly 
losing her mind, and then began to talk about the robbery. 

Judy barely heard him. She was thinking. She had an idea and, if she 
could only connect it with — suddenly it came to her, and she jumped up 
shouting. "Eureka! I've got it! I've got it!" 

"Got what?" her father inquired impatiently. "Stop that confounded 
shouting and tell me what you've got." 

"The solution to the diamond robbery!" cried Judy excitedly. "It seems 
fantastic, but it's the only possible explanation." 

Challenge to the Reader 
Do you know who stole the diamonds? Do you know what Judy saw 
that gave her a solution to the mystery? 

Solution 

After the excitement of the capture was over, Judy and her mother 
discussed the affair. 

"You see, mom," she said, "there was one thing about Mrs. Benton that 
bothered me. Before a man sits down, he pulls his trousers up, and Mrs. 
Benton did it! Not once, but twice!" Her mother looked at her quizzically. 
"I knew she was a man. Only I couldn't figure out why she — he — was 
disguised as a woman." 

Then she told her mother about the conversation she had overheard. 
"Once I knew about the robbery it was easy to reason it this way! Those 
men were taking ice to Mrs. Benton and collecting for it later. Substituting 
diamonds for ice and knowing that Mrs. Benton was a man made it easy." 

"But, Judy," queried Mrs. Duane, "where did you find the jewels?" 
She didn't keep them in plain sight, did she?" 

"No. They were hidden in the back of the wooden rocker she told me 
not to sit in." 

"You know," she reflected, "this whole affair has given me an idea for 
my short story. I — think — I'll call it — The Woman Who Wasn't. 

Lillian Parker 
Page 38 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Front Row: Louis P'ederzani, Alice Dugan 

Second Row: Robert Roncarati, Catherine Baratta 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Front Row: Mario Giammarco, David Montanari 
Second Row: Barbara Baratta, George Scotti 



Page 39 



Junior Miss 

Monday — Dear Diary: The beautiful precision of my alarm clock 
arouses in me no feeling of admiration when it shatters my peaceful slum- 
ber. Its mad ringing is a constant harbinger of bad news too early in the 
morning: a Latin test! a French recitation! an essay to write! no study 
period today! Nevertheless, I expeditiously prepared for school, cramming 
in those Latin verbs and that last piece of toast simultaneously. 

During the course of six periods I flunked the Latin test, broke a 
chemistry test-tube, and had another scrap with Bob. On the credit side, 
though, my French teacher was pleasantly amazed at my recitation. Maybe 
some day I'll play opposite Charles Boyer. After school I went to Press 
Club and then stayed for basketball practise. As usual, I was pushed 
around like a cart in the First National. In the process I somehow sprained 
my finger, and now I can hardly use it. However, that will never excuse 
me from writing the essay. 

Tuesday — Dear Diary: That infernal essay kept me awake till nearly 
midnight, but now it's written and off my already over-burdened mind. 
I arrived at school before ten past on this comparatively uneventful 
day. I stayed after school for Glee Club and warbled with the rest of the 
canaries till 2:15. Oh, I almost forgot — Bob admitted he was wrong, and 
we made up. 

Wednesday — Dear Diary: I broke my beautiful record this morning 
as I made a not-too-graceful entrance at 8: 20. The combination of my locker 
always seems to slip my mind when I'm in a hurry. It was surely a lucky 
thing that I had gym first period. 

Because of my inexcusable tardiness this morning, I was sentenced to 
remain in my home room for the sum total of twenty-five minutes after 
school! I didn't really mind, though. Bob had to stay, too, and we chatted 
about the basketball team which experienced its first victory last night. 
This was a red-letter day on my calendar! Bob asked me to the Prom with 
him if he gets a job and if he can get the car. Now all I have to do is to 
wheedle a new gown from Dad. 

Thursday — Dear Diary: I awoke with a start this morning after 
dreaming all night of how gloriously I had passed the algebra test sched- 
uled for today. I felt as victorious as Eisenhower himself till I remembered 
that the day had just begun, and I had yet to take the dreaded examination. 

I got excused from English today for an S.A.S. meeting. After six 
periods of tedious brain work, there was Glee Club again. Then Sally and I 
spent a half hour evaluating the manly beauty of our basketball quintette as 
the boys practised for the clash tomorrow night. 

Friday — Dear Diary: Friday is the omega of the school week before 
an all-too-short weekend. I used up the last cent of my weekly allowance 
which is always gone before I realize it. I had to catch up on my ten-cent- 
a-week plan so I could attend the basketball game tonight almost free of 
charge. I'll probably be compelled to extract those two lucky pennies from 
my loafers, but nothing short of a tidal wave could keep me from that game! 

With totem-pole patience, I am making ready for and looking forward 
to that not-too-distant day when I become a senior. 

Pauline Armstrong 
Page 40 



*umor 



[^oetm i^a 



"u i" aa 



e 



YOU CANNOT BUY 



A VETERAN'S SALUTE 



You cannot buy 

Misty, perfumed summer rain. 
Or the purple mountains 

Shawled in winter's snowy fame. 

You cannot buy 

A frosty silver -peppered autumn sky, 
Or the sound of 

Spring brooks gurgling gaily by. 

Marjorie Birnstein 



/ salute you, Uncle Sam, 
For all you've done for me. 
I'm proud to live in America, 
To dwell in a land that's free. 

Away from Europe's horrors, 

Its dictators arid kings, 

I'm proud to live in a land that's free 

Where everybody sings. 

Mary Francis 



BOBBY-SOCKER 



SEA FOAM 



Short, plaid skirt and big, white socks, 
A baggy sweater and flowing locks, 
Scuffed-out loafers and a ribbon of blue, 
This is our friend, Bobby-sock Sue. 

A tulip smidae rich with goo 

Is one of the things that pleases Sue. 

Records of Bing and Perry galore 

Are stacked up high on her bedroom floor. 

At seventeen she knows it all, 
Strictly speaking, she's on the ball! 
Her looks are exotic and intelligence high; 
The boys look twice when Sue passes by. 

Lydia Rowell 



HARD TO PLEASE 



Majestically 

The spiraling breath of the night 

Whips the white of the sea 

Into a lace-like frosting 

For the eternal waters. 

The reluctant sands 

Wrestle with the begging tides, 

While the pastel moonbeams 

Transform the flying spray 

Into glistening diamonds. 

The phantom-like swish 

Of the whispering sea 

Lures the lonesome shells closer 

To reveal a thousand secrets 

Entombed beneath its waves. 



Ruth Kessler 



When I was two I heard them say 

In voices low filled with dismay, 

"She's such a homely child, poor dear, 

And such a bother to be near. 

Her hair is straight, it has no curl — 

She'd make a better boy than girl. 

Her legs are long, she has big feet. 

Her bones we see, but where's the meat? 

She never talks, but sits and sighs, 

And stares and stares through big brown 

eyes." 
But now the words they say are such: 
"She curls her hair and talks too much. 
The meat that as a child she lacked 
Is ample now and poorly stacked." 
But what care I if they still tease? 
It's not my fault they're hard to please! 



EVERYBODY'S DOING SOMETHING 

Heifitz is playing in Boston, 
Sandburg is writing a poem; 

There's a steel strike up in Philly, 
Two million vets are home. 

Tracy has caught up with Scarface, 
Superman is still "going strong," 

Churchill is taking life easy, 
Crosby still groans out his song. 

Me? All I'm doing is sitting; 

There isn't a thing to be done! 
But please don't say that I'm lazy, 

It's hard chewing war-time gum. 



Eva Paoletti 



Daniel Alves 



Page 41 



J^opkomore l^oetru \-^c 



"u i" aa 



aae 



RIVER 

From yonder hill there can be seen 
A line of silver, a fringe of green; 
Through the meadows, bright and free, 
The river races toward the sea. 

As the stream in the valley glides along, 
Against the pebbles it chants a song; 
The rippling waves in the sun gleam bright 
With darting minnows and sparkling light. 

Walter Correa 



OBSERVATION 

I looked and saw before my eyes 
Smisets fade from clear, cold skies; 
Song birds chirp in merry tune, 
And fireflies gleam in radiant June; 
Prayerful trees bow down to God, 
And weary farmers plow the sod; 
Waters bite the rocky shore, 
And flowers grace the forest floor — 
All these sights, and more besides, 
I gazed upon with open eyes. 

Robert Merritt 



REFLECTIONS 

Be not content, for all content is pride 
In being with yourself well satisfied; 
The fish that never wandered from his pool 
Was very much disgusted when it dried. 

Who knows the wonder of a secret hour 
When each doth find within himself a 

power 
To take the world, or leave it as he please, 
And never more before its idols cower? 

Few things are certain in this Vale of 

Sorrow: 
Do not from the unknown Future borrow, 
Nor spend your time in fading Yesterday, 
Live in Today — there may not be a 

Morrow. 

MORDINA McCLURE 



STAR FLOWERS 



Stars are but flowers 
In the garden of God; 
They bloom nightly 
Folding tightly 
With the light 
Of dawn. 



John Grady 



THE SNOW 

The snow falls softly to the ground, 
With scarcely any stir or sound, 
And covers all the earth with white — 
A puff to warm her in the night. 

It drifts against our garden gate, 
And downs the bushes with its weight; 
It covers houses, fields, and hills 
And swallows up the mountain rills. 

Morning comes and earth awakes 
To find it's lost in silvery flakes; 
And golden sunbeams now unfold 
To push away the biting cold. 

Warren M. Axford 



RAIN 

The rain comes 
in silver tears. 

It lingers weeping 

o'er the slumbering town 

amidst the somber gloom of night — 

then patters on. 

Marjorie Russell 



NIGHT 

Night 

Comes like a raven-haired goddess 

Majestically, 

Heralded by the blazing sunset, 

Shading the world with coal-black tresses. 

Crowned with twinkling diamonds, 

Reflected by the mirror of the moon, 

Upon her shadowy throne 

She reigns supreme till sunrise. 

Elinore Shea 



Page 42 



4k?^t 



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IT ^ ■■■ 


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aiftemama 



FALLACY. To prove that a part of a line is equal to the whole line. 



Let ABC be a triangle; and to fix our 
ideas, let us suppose that the triangle is 
scalene, that the angle B is acute, and 
that angle A is greater than angle C. 
From A draw AD making angle BAD 
equal to angle C, and cutting BC in D. 
From A draw AE perpendicular to BC. 



Statements 

1. ZB = IB 

2. /.BAD = ZC. 

3. AABC~AABD 




4. 



AABC = AC 2 
AABC ~ AD 2 



Triangles ABC and ABD are of equal altitude. 

AABC AC 
AABD BD 
BC AC 2 



6. 



BD ~~ AD 2 

AB 2 + BC 2 - 2BC X BE 
BC 



AB 2 + BD 2 - 2BD X BE 
BD 



AB 2 
BC 



+ BC - 2BE = 



AB 2 
BD 



+ BD - 2BE 



BC " BD 

AB 2 - BC X BD 

BC 



BC 



AB 2 - BC X BD 
BD 
BC = BD 

A result which is impossible. What's wrong? 



1. Identity 

2. Construction 

3. Two triangles are similar if two angles 
of one equal two angles of the other. 

4. Two similar triangles are to each other 
as the squares of any two correspond- 
ing sides. 

5. Two triangles of equal altitudes are to 
each other as their bases. 

6. Quantities equal to the same quantity 
are equal to each other. 

7. The square of the side opposite an 
acute angle in a triangle equals the sum 
of the squares of the other two sides 
decreased by twice the product of one 
of these and the projection of the other 
side upon it. 

Simplifying 



Cont. by Gertrude Merritt '46 



Page 44 




In thia figure can i/ou find : 

/. a si*- pointed star 1 Z9 parallelograms 
2. 3fc poi^oons S. 9 rectangles 

b. H3 tr i angle a 

Corctnb. \>y George, fiver y 



3. 16 c/i 



avnonds 



J. 



A SIMPLE RADICAL EQUATION 

y/Sx - 11 + 3.r = V\2x - 23 
3a- - 11 + 3.r = Vl2x - 23 
3x + (\ cups chopped olives)* 2 = 12x — 23 
2\/3 cups sugar 4 8 = \\ cups vinegar — 843 
Mix well and add 2 eggs (well beaten). 2 
After eggs are thoroughly mixed with batter, separate yolks and add 2V.34 X 23. 
You then have the sin .074 times v 7 ^ — 1 cup salt. 

(Note) — The batter may appear a bit lumpy, but this can be eliminated by adding 
x 2 + if - 843. 

Since the hypotenuse forms an isosceles triangle, the tables of logarithms may be con- 
sulted. 
Thus far you have: 

x- 4 3x/y + if 4 843 -^9 + 1 cup baking soda = 1| 
Pop into oven set at 5000° F. Bake five or six hours, or until a drop will form a solid ball 
in cold water. 

Dip off the scum which has risen to the top. 
You will then have: 

12±x 2 4- l'ixy 4 893.1 - ^81 = 7 
As any one can plainly see from this simple equation: x = 0.1 

Robert Smiley '46 



Page 45 



DID YOU REALIZE THAT— 

In Germany in the sixteenth century the length of standards were 
determined as follows: Stand at the door of a church on Sunday and bid 
sixteen men to stop, tall ones and short ones, as they happen to pass out 
when the service is finished. Then make them put their left feet one behind 
the other, and the length obtained is the rod and one sixteenth the foot? 

In England Henry I established the yard as the distance from the point 
of his nose to the end of his thumb, and Parliament seriously established 
standards of length and weight according to grains of wheat and barley. 
Shoes are still measured in a system of numeration by 13's. The hand is 
used as measure for the height of horses? 

We have the fathom (from faetham, the embrace) , the length of two 
arms from tip to tip? 

Katherine Palches '47 

OBVIOUS? 

1. Can you prove that 960 equals 1000? 

2. Can you take one from nine and get ten? 

3. How can you place three 9's so that they will exactly equal ten? 

4. How much dirt is there in a hole 3 feet by 2 feet by 1 foot? 

5. Four sheep ahead of a sheep, four sheep bshind, and a sheep in 
the middle. How many sheep are there? 

Cont. by Mary Holt '48 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

Front Row: Mr. Richard Smiley, Miss Nellie Locklin, Louis Pederzani. Herbert Kearsley, Barbara 

Bagni, Miss Jeanette Jacques, Mr. Claiborne Young 
Second Row: Charles Mathewson, Barbara Baratta, Constance Jenney, Alice Dugan, Pauline Ruflini, 

Pauline Armstrong. Catherine Brigida, Ruth Van Amburgh, Marjorie Radclifle, David Montanari 
Third Row: John Banker, Walter Correa, Mario Giammarco, Donald Raymond, George Martin, 

James Butters, Linwood Ellis, Paul Ferrari. Harry Emond 
Fourth Row: Kenneth Telfer, Raymond Girard, Henry Ferrari, Donald Pederzini, Henry Stephani, 

Norman Clark, Harold Govoni, Kenneth Clark, James Lamborghini 



Page 46 




l^Lqskin j^arade 



Photo by Robert Silva 



WHEN the final whistle blew ending the Fairhaven game, ten of 
Plymouth's starting eleven realized that they had played their last 
football game for Plymouth High School. These ten boys were all 
seniors who, together with a large number of juniors and sophomores, had 
reported to Coaches Louis Rudolph and Mario Romano early in September 
to begin the 1945 grid season. 

With nine veterans reporting, hopes ran high for a successful season, 
and the squad practised diligently in preparation for the First Annual South 
Shore Jamboree which was scheduled for September fifteenth. 

JAMBOREE — PLYMOUTH — HANOVER 

Before a crowd of eight thousand spectators the leading schools of the 
South Shore met in Abington to participate in the Jamboree. Plymouth 
drew Hanover as an opponent, and in a game consisting of two seven- 
minute periods neither team scored. Both teams had considerable trouble 
getting their offense to function, and most of Plymouth's gains were limited 
to a few substantial runs by Buddy Roncarati. 

PLYMOUTH - ABINGTON 26 

In their first home game of the scheduled season, the Blue and White 
of Plymouth succumbed to a strong Abington aggregation led by Captain 
Dave Roan, who was responsible for three of his team's tallies. The statistics 
showed that Plymouth outran Abington, but three fumbles by Plymouth 
backs proved costly, and Plymouth threatened only once when, in the 
closing seconds of the first half, Kenny Telfer, Plymouth left end, grabbed 
a pass on the Abington twenty and raced to the one-yard line. Telfer was 
hurt on the play, however, and was sidelined for a month with a dislocated 
elbow. The loss of his services was a hard blow to the team. 

PLYMOUTH 14 — ROCKLAND 6 

The Plymouth boys journeyed to Rockland for their second game of the 
season, and through the efforts of a hard-charging line and the superb 
running of Buddy Roncarati and Herb Kearsley they scored two touch- 
downs in the first half. 

Puge 47 



Plymouth took the kick-off, and marched on a sustained drive down 
the field with Roncarati scoring on an end-sweep. Capitalizing on a Rock- 
land fumble, which was recovered by Henry Ferrari, Plymouth guard, 
Plymouth again drove down the field with Roncarati spurting off his own 
right end and crossing the goal line standing up. 

PLYMOUTH 13 — BRIDGEWATER 

Once again the injury jinx hit Plymouth. Buddy Roncarati, the hard- 
running fullback, received a knee injury during a practice scrimmage and 
was lost to the team for the rest of the season. 

With Ted Young taking over the fullback position, the Plymouth team 
took the field determined to win the game, and, before the first half had 
ended, the local boys had scored two touchdowns. 

Now the team was really clicking both offensively and defensively. 
The line, led by Captain John Banker, kept the Bridgewater backs intact 
throughout the afternoon, and the running of Herb Kearsley and Ray 
Girard set up the first Plymouth score. Plymouth was again knocking at 
Bridgewater's door when Ted Young sliced off his own right end and put 
Plymouth in scoring territory. On the next play Herb Kearsley took the 
ball on a quick opener, and with fine blocking from his teammates he drove 
off-tackle for Plymouth's second score. 

PLYMOUTH 6 — MIDDLEBORO 13 

It was necessary for Coach Rudolph to revise the Plymouth backfield 
for the Middleboro game, for "Pepper" Martin, Plymouth quarterback, 
fractured his nose the day before this game, so Ted Young, who had been 
playing fullback, moved into the quarterback position. Herb Kearsley, 
regular halfback, took over the fullback job, and William Guidetti took 
Kearsley's place at halfback. 

In the first half of the game it looked as though Plymouth was headed 
for the victory column again, but the Orange and Black of Middleboro 
displayed an aggressive offensive in the second half and overcame Plym- 
outh's six-point lead by scoring two touchdowns. Plymouth's lone tally 
was made in the first quarter when Ted Young threw a pass to Ray Girard 
in the end zone. 

PLYMOUTH 6 — BRAINTREE 7 

Before a large, surprised crowd of Braintree fans a small, underdog 
Plymouth team led a powerful Braintree team 6-0 for almost three quarters 
of the game. 

In the second quarter, the Plymouth team took the ball on its own 
twenty-yard line, and through a series of quick-opening "T" formation 
plays, marched to Braintree's twenty. On the next play the man in motion, 
Ray Girard, caught a pass out in the flat and carried the ball all the way for 
a touchdown. The try for the vital extra-point was not good. 

Braintree's scoring chance came in the third quarter when a Donovan 
to Sweezey pass put the team in scoring position. There was an infraction 
of the rules by a Braintree player, but, because the head linesman could 
not identify the offender, this important penalty was disregarded. Brain- 
tree continued on the touchdown march and also made the important point- 
after which meant victory. 

Page 48 




Photos by Elst'on Bartlett, Jr. 

PLYMOUTH 13 — WHITMAN 6 

Playing before a large home following, the Plymouth team scored two 
early touchdowns which were sufficient to defeat an ancient rival, the Red 
and Black of Whitman. 

After taking a Whitman punt, Plymouth marched the length of the 
field in five successive plays, and scored on a quarterback buck from the 
four-yard line. Only about five minutes had elapsed when the hard-charg- 
ing line of the Plymouth team forced a Whitman back to fumble. The ball 
was recovered by Captain Banker, and Plymouth was ready to roll again. 
On the first play Ted Young took a lateral pass and ran twenty yards for 
Plymouth's second score. 

Whitman fought back stubbornly in the second half and succeeded in 
scoring one touchdown. 

PLYMOUTH — BARNSTABLE 20 

Plymouth High was completely dominated by a strong, aggressive 
Barnstable team in a game played on Cape Cod. 

The local boys threatened only once when they penetrated the Barn- 
stable defense as far as the twenty-yard line. 

Barnstable finished the season with eight wins and two defeats, and 
the Plymouth boys admit that the Cape Codders had a fine team this year. 

PLYMOUTH 13 - STOUGHTON 6 

A large crowd came to Stephens Field on Armistice Day to witness 
Plymouth's last home game of the season. 

Stoughton took the kick-off and, after being held for three downs, took 
to the air and completed a long pass deep into Plymouth territory. The 
opposition tried two bucks and then another pass which resulted in a touch- 
down. As the half ended, Stoughton was leading 6-0. 

Coach Rudolph started most of Plymouth's second team when the game 
was resumed, and with fine running by Dave Montanari and William 
Guidetti the local boys moved all the way to the Stoughton four-yard line 
where Montanari smashed off-tackle to give Plymouth its first score. The 
first team then returned to the game, and on the second play after Plym- 
outh took possession of the ball Herb Kearsley drove off left tackle, 
reversed his field, outraced the Stoughton secondary, and carried the ball 
forty-five yards to the Stoughton eight-yard line. 

With only a few minutes remaining before the final whistle, Kenny 
Telfer caught a pass in the end zone, thus insuring victory for Plymouth. 

Page 49 



PLYMOUTH 7 — FAIRHAVEN 19 

Plymouth traveled to Fairhaven for the final game of the season, and 
in the first half Fairhaven built up a twelve-point lead. 

After a rather eventless third quarter, things began to happen. Plym- 
outh was in possession of the ball on its own five-yard line. Ray Girard 
started out to the left as the man in motion gathered speed as he went, and, 
as he reached the ten-yard line, he caught the ball beautifully over his 
shoulder and galloped fifty yards before being brought down by the Fair- 
haven safety man. This put Plymouth in scoring territory and the local 
boys tried desperately to get a touchdown before the game ended. A pass 
to Telfer was incomplete, and then another pass exactly like the previous 
one was taken by Girard, who raced twenty yards down the sidelines and 
crossed the goal line standing up. 

On the kick-off that followed, Jim Butters, Plymouth center, was in- 
jured and had to leave the game. The Fairhaven boys took possession of 
the ball on the fifty-yard line, and in a series of line plunges drove all the 
way down to the Plymouth three where they smashed off-tackle for their 
third and final score of the game. 

SCHEDULE 

OPPONENT P.H.S. 

ABINGTON 26 

ROCKLAND 6 14 

BRIDGEWATER 13 

MIDDLEBORO 13 6 

BRAINTREE 7 6 

WHITMAN 6 13 

BARNSTABLE 20 

STOUGHTON 6 13 

FAIRHAVEN 19 7 




FOOTBALL TEAM 

Front Row: Arthur Shaw, Robert Torrance. Donald Pederzini, Henry Ferrari, James Butters, John 

Banker, Edward Mello, Richard Buttner 
Second Row: Coach Louis Rudolph, Raymond Girard, Robert Roncarati, George Martin, Herbert 

Kearsley, William Guidelti, Kenneth Telfer— missing because of injury 

Page 50 



^J^roop ^Jsflakuakt; 



T-^'f 




A 



S SOON as the foot- 
ball togs had been 
stored away, a call 
was issued by Coach "Jeff" 
Nunez for all basketball 
candidates to report for 
practice, and under his 
watchful eyes the squad 
prepared for its first en- 
counter with a star-studded 
Alumni team. Two boys, 

ffP^.^ however, could not practice 

ttf]^ V v^j ■& because of injuries. Harold 

Govoni, a regular last year, 
had undergone an appen- 
dectomj' and needed an- 
other week of rest, and 
photo by Robert siiva "Buddy" Roncarati was 
still nursing a leg injury received during the football season. 

Before a large home audience at Memorial Hall, the Plymouth High 
quintet was defeated by the Alumni 30 to 20. The entire Alumni team was 
composed of World War II veterans, and they proved conclusively that 
they had lost none of their pre-war basketball ability. "Tim" Butters and 
"Lenny" Bernardo, both former Army men, shared the scoring honors for 
the Alumni while Captain "Jimmy" Butters was high scorer for the 
school boys. 

For almost the entire month of January, Plymouth came out on the 
short end of the scores. Two games were lost to Rockland, one to Barn- 
stable, and another to Fairhaven. "Jimmy" Butters sprained his neck in 
the Fairhaven game and was side-lined for a week. 

Finally, on January 25, the Blue and White defeated Whitman 28 to 25 
in a game played in Whitman, and, on the following Tuesday, Plymouth 
avenged an earlier defeat by decisively trouncing Fairhaven 41 to 30 in a 
game played at the Plymouth High School. Scoring honors were shared by 
"Dick" Burgess and "Peaches" McCosh. 

Plymouth then suffered three more consecutive defeats, losing to Coyle, 
Barnstable, and Abington. These three games were played away from 
home, but on February 15th Plymouth returned to Memorial Hall and 
trounced Whitman 55 to 27. Plymouth was leading at the half, but in the 
third quarter, paced by "Dick" Burgess, who scored twenty-six points, 
the local boys increased their lead and coasted to an easy victory. 

Next came the upset of the year. A highly-favored Coyle team that had 
previously defeated Plymouth by a lopsided 47 to 27 score was edged out 
by Plymouth 32 to 30. Plymouth's first five — Butters, Martin, Govoni, 
Burgess, and McCosh — played exceptionally well, and mention must also 

Page 51 



be given to Norman Clark who in the closing minutes scored three beauti- 
fully-executed bucket shots which were instrumental in winning the game. 
This was Plymouth's first victory over Coyle since the 1942 season. 

The closing game of the season was another thriller which found 
Plymouth on the winning end of a 22 to 21 score with Abington. Melvin 
Klasky's set-shot in the closing seconds of the game provided the margin 
of victory and drew the curtain on another basketball season. 

SOUTH SHORE TOURNAMENT 

Before a large crowd at the Brockton Y.M.C.A. on Washington's 

Birthday, Plymouth was defeated by Middleboro 28 to 25 in a hard-fought 

contest. The local boys had a substantial lead at half time, but were unable 

to maintain it — and thus Plymouth was eliminated from the tourney. 

SCHEDULE 

Opponent P.H.S. 

Alumni 30 20 

Rockland 31 23 

Fairhaven 40 24 

Barnstable 36 30 

Rockland 47 27 

Whitman 25 28 

Fairhaven 30 41 

Coyle 47 27 

Barnstable 38 26 

Abington 30 20 

Whitman 27 55 

Coyle 30 32 

Abington 21 22 

SOUTH SHORE TOURNAMENT 
Opponent P.H.S. 

Middleboro 28 24 




BASKETBALL TEAM 
Front Row: Melvin Klasky, Louis Pederzani, Norman Clark. Harold Govoni. James Butters. George 

Martin, Robert Roncarati, Richard Buttner, Richard Burgess 
Second Row: Angus McLeod. Linwood Ellis, Richard Gavoni, Coach Joffrey Nunez. David Montanari, 

Kenneth Hebert, John Roy 
Third Row: Ralph Guaraldi, Charles McCosh, Earl Rebello, George Scotti, Walter Morton 

Page 52 




THE hockey team be- 
gan practice this year 
23| with about forty girls 

i^fl participating. This number 

included a large percentage 
of sophomores who were 
welcomed enthusiastically 
■' '» w i, ^ by the upperclassmen. 
Since transportation was no 
longer a problem, all the 
girls were able to attend 
the games in buses. 

The season opened with 
a scrimmage game at 
Marshfield, which served 
very well to refresh the 
rules to both teams. 
The team was victorious in its first scheduled game played at Mid- 
dleboro. 

In the second contest played at Scituate, the Plymouth girls fought 
hard, but were forced to taste defeat. 

The succeeding games with Hingham and Middleboro on the home 
field were ably played, and especially revealed the ability of the first-team 
sophomores, Tina Turini and Lillian Sharkey, as fullbacks. 

The second contest with Hingham was the second defeat of the season, 
but the squad was far from discouraged. 

The season ended with a free-for-all with the football team, which 
resulted in a tie and several bruises and cuts for the female participants. 
The members of the hockey team are grateful to Miss Carolyn Parren 
for her instruction and advice throughout the season, to Mrs. Beatrice 
Garvin for refereeing many of the games, and to the senior girls who served 
as alternate captains this year. 

Opponent Plymouth 

Middleboro 2 3 

Scituate 3 1 

Hingham 1 1 

Middleboro 2 

Hingham 3 

Football Team 1 1 

10 8 

THE girls' basketball season was organized this year with emphasis 
on class games as there was a sufficient number of girls for a team to 
represent each class. Weekly practices under Miss Carolyn Parren's 
direction were arranged for each team, the Sophomores reporting on 
Monday and the Juniors and Seniors on Wednesday. 

Page 53 





FOREIGN 



LANGUAGES 



Nous Sommes Treize 

Cette annee, nous sommes treize Seniors en classe. Par comparison 
avec d'autres annees, notre classe est plus nombreuse. Aussi, nous sommes 
tiers de nous vanter de cinq gargons parmi notre nombre. Pour les deux 
annees passees, la classe de troisieme annee de francais n'etait compose que 
de six jeunes filles. 

Notre premier livre cette annee etait une collection des contes par Guy 
de Maupassant. Apres avoir fini cette lecture, nous avons decide de tenter 
des contes a la Guy de Maupassant. Nous vous en offrons deux. 

Echoing Footsteps 

By Raymond Girard 

A cold, heavy fog blanketed the village of Beauvais at midnight, the 
night was dark and the streets deserted. For this Pierre Vallon was 
grateful as he stealthily glided through the dark. 

"Why was he depressed?" he asked himself. Why did he have this 
strange feeling? What was it? Everything had been perfect and worked 
out according to their plans. Was not the great Oise dam destroyed, in 
absolute ruin and useless to the Nazis? The same Nazis who had murdered 
his wife Germaine and sent his son to a Nazi youth camp. He had avenged 
his wife and son and struck a decisive blow in the liberation of a Free 
France. Why did he have this strange haunting feeling? 

Suddenly he heard them, their footsteps echoing in the deserted cobble- 
stone streets. He quickened his pace, he mustn't let them catch him now. 
The Gestapo had ways of making a man talk; Pierre was afraid of torture. 
Never before had they been so near. All night they had pursued him but 
now they were closing in, for the kill! Cold beads of sweat dampened 
Pierre's brow. He ran; but they ran also. He knew he must hide. He must 
find refuge in some home, anywhere so long as they couldn't find him. 
Suddenly they appeared from nowhere, uniforms further down the .street. 
He was cornered but in the fog he was still invisible. Crazed with fear 
Pierre dashed into the nearest building. 

Colonel Von Hienrich was an officer of the German Gestapo, efficient 
and cunning and worthy of his nickname, "The Hangman." "At last," he 
remarked to his aide, "we have one of them cornered. Now we will uncover 
the entire sabotage ring. We'll capture him alive and make him talk. He 
is in there somewhere." He gestured with a wave of his hand to a group 

Page 56 



of foreboding buildings on the bank of the river. Conducting the search 
personally, he entered an old hotel, dilapidated with age and housing many 
questionable characters. The saboteur was not there. He left, and with his 
men went from house to house with no results. 

Near the end of the street there appeared an old building grey and 
ghastly, looming up out of its blanket of fog. Across the doorway was a 
sign bearing these words, "Beauvais City Morgue." Leaving no hiding place 
untouched, Colonel Hienrich beat upon the door and after a brief pause, 
a grey-haired old man, very short with stooped shoulders, admitted them. 
His eyes were red and flaming. It was evident he had been drinking. He 
was a traitor to France, only German sympathizers were given wine and 
public positions. Upon seeing Hienrich, he turned rather white, but still 
retained a silly stupified gaze. Hienrich demanded to be shown around the 
building with such a violent tone, the old man was truly startled and pro- 
ceeded to do so with the agility of a man forty years younger. First they 
searched the attic with no results, next the offices and still no Vailon. 
Descending into the cellar of the morgue, the old man allowed Hienrich to 
examine the storage room. Here the bodies were laid out on slabs, covered 
by white sheets. 

As the atmosphere was cold, damp, and had the stench of dead bodies, 
Hienrich investigated hastily and was ascending the stairs when the old 
man cried, "Mon Dieu, it moved!" He pointed to a body near-by and 
turned white with horror. So startled was Hienrich he lost his balance and 
cursing the old man landed in a heap at the foot of the stairs. "You drunken 
fool," he cried in rage and grasping the rifle of a nearby soldier, he struck 
the keeper a cruel blow on the forehead. Leaving the old man lying in a 
pool of his own blood, Hienrich left, thoroughly humiliated at having the 
saboteur escape from his very hands and having a drunken old man frighten 
him before his men. 

As the last soldier left the morgue, the corpse smiled. Pierre felt fine 
now. 



A Letter 

By Carolyn Trufant 

69 Charles Street 
Le Havre, France 
August 10, 1945 
Dear Jacques, 

When you left this country six years ago, you left expecting to be 
joined by your older sister, Marie. Perhaps you still lie awake at night, 
wondering why she never came; a million little fears crowding your 
thoughts. Perhaps you read in the paper where thousands of French people 
were sent to Germany to work in the factories. Perhaps you read where 
fifty Frenchmen were shot as hostages. Each time did you ask yourself, 
"Was Marie among them?" No, Jacques, your sister was not one of these. 
I often ask myself, "Wouldn't it have been better if she had?" 

You know, of course, that Peronne was captured by the German 

Page 57 



dreamy; the other very practical: yet Professeur Pipe will not admit defeat, 
for he is certain that, if correctly executed, the Pipe method cannot fail 
to produce two human machines, exactly alike in thoughts, desires, and 
actions. 

Aussi, avant une certaine date au mois de juin, nous esperons avoir de 
premiere main un compte du Mardi Gras a la Nouvelle-Orleans par un 
ancien eleve qui est dans le service a present; une visite d'une jeune 
parisienne, l'epouse d'un de nos anciens eleves de Plymouth High; et une 
exposition d'articles remportes de France depuis cette guerre. 

Nunc ut Turn 

Horribile bellum perfectum est; iamque incipiebat lenta et anxia 
exspectatio reditus amatorum qui pugnaverunt et qui vulnerati sunt. 
Domi sunt coniuges, precantes ut sui mariti salvi sint atque celeriter 
redeant. Coniuges cum pectoribus gravibus exspectant, mirantes et 
incertae sui mariti domum veniant necne. 

Haud aliter olim exspectabat patiens Penelope-Penelope qui annos 
lentos decern reditum coniugis Ulixi Ithacum ab bello Trojano exspect- 
abat. Frustra amatores multi earn in matrimmonium ducere conati sunt. 
Semper suum responsum retinebat dum uno die Telemachus et Penelope 
lacrimas laetitiae fundentes, Ulixum domum redire viderunt. 

Ut cum canis fidus Ulixi, qui mortuus est cum suum magistrum 
redeuntem vidit, una cum Penelope exspectabat, haud aliter hodie canes 
fideles et multi reditum dominorum pugnantium suorum exspectant. 

Sylvia Bolotin 

Latina Vivit Hodie 

The romantic language of ancient Rome is still alive today. Here in 
our own town we have examples of the Latin language. For instance, on 
the Training Green monument we find: 

"Memoria in Eterna" 
These words express more beautifully than our own language the love 
and respect we have for those who went before us. 

Though the Pilgrims came here to begin a new life in this "new 
world," they brought remnants of the old world with them. On Burial Hill 
tombstones the following epitaphs have been discovered: 

"Qua patres difficillime 
adepti sunt nolite turpiter 

Tombstone of Gov. Bradford 
"Memento mori" 

Tombstone of Capt. Joseph Fulghum 
"Sic Transit Gloria Mundi" 

Tombstone of Miss Hannah Rowland 
"Requiescant in Pace. Amen" 

To the five children of James and Mary Burns 
"Hie non corpus sed illi locus carissimus" 

Tombstone of John A. Goodwin 
Marjorie Nickerson 

Page 60 



f\eport on ^Arctiuities 



m 



ON the opening day of school new suits, jackets, skirts and sweaters 
were proudly displayed and old friendships were renewed, but the 
end of the first day brought with it some realization of the work 
ahead. 

In one of the first assemblies of the year, Herbert Kearsley, president 
of the Student Activities Society, explained the operation of the Ten-Cents- 
a-Week plan and the benefits which pupils receive from membership in it. 

The band and orchestra were organized under the direction of Mrs. 
Bernice Kelly. Miss Eleanor Anifantis, the new director of glee club, hoped 
to organize a mixed choral group, but the boys, apparently, were not 
interested. 

Many girls attended the try-outs for the octet which were held after 
glee club rehearsals. This year the octet consists of the following members: 
Constance Jenney, Thelma Bourne, Jane Hennessey, Marjorie Nickerson, 
Virginia Marois, Gertrude Merritt, Marjorie Russell, and Dolores Souza. 

With very little time in which to practice, the football squad journeyed 
to Abington to play against Hanover in the South Shore Jamboree. Since 
buses were provided, many spirited supporters were there, as they were 
at following games, to cheer their team to victory. 

October: 

Miss Eleanor Anifantis was introduced to the school at an informal 
assembly where she led in the singing of patriotic songs. Professor 
Augustine Smith of Boston University also directed the school in group 
singing. 

The Columbus Day assembly was held under the direction of Miss 
Margie Wilber. It was opened by Harold Young, and Pauline Armstrong, 
Marjorie Nickerson, Gloria Lacey, and Katherine Palches spoke on the 
importance and meaning of the day. At this time the Girls' Glee Club made 
its first public appearance. 

The Honor Society met to elect its officers: president, Raymond Girard; 
vice-president, Richard Correa; secretary, Catherine Brigida; and repre- 
sentative to the S. A. S., Ruth VanAmburgh. 

The Victory Loan Drive was opened by Herbert Kearsley, president of 
the organization which sponsored the drive. George Martin gave a talk 
to emphasize its importance. 

November: 

Miss Amy Rafter resigned to be married, and Mrs. Mary Foley sub- 
stituted for a time until Mr. Arthur Pyle returned from the service to 
teach American history. 

The long-awaited Senior Dance was held in the gymnasium and proved 
to be a very enjoyable affair. The door prize, won by Roberta Lovell, was 
a doll named Chloe. 

The members of the National Honor Society went to Kingston and then 
to Oliver Ames High School in North Easton to induct members into the 
newly-formed chapters there. 

Page 61 



In the Thanksgiving assembly, Barbara Bagni spoke on "The History 
of Thanksgiving" which was followed by a play, "Planning the First Thanks- 
giving." Those having special speaking parts were Norman Lotow, the town 
crier; Katherine Palches, the Pilgrim dame; Philip Barnes, the deacon; 
and Norman Clark, the preacher. Henry Stefani gave a very realistic 
portrayal of the Indian. Others in the play sang a number of hymns and 
the octet offered "The Breaking Waves Dashed High." At recess that day 
turkey dinners were served. 

At the first meeting of the photography club, officers were elected: 
president, Elston Bartlett; vice-president, Harold Bumpus; secretary, 
Carolyn Wood; and treasurer, Robert Silva. 




PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

Front Row: Mary Francis, Carolyn Wood, Elston Bartlett, Mr. Claiborne Young, Harold Bumpus, 

Robert Silva, Mary Janeiro 
Second Row: Harriet Douglas, Barbara Cavicchi, Hilda Belcher, Christine Axford, Lois Roy, Edna 

Salmi, Elaine Cortelli, Pauline Armstrong 
Third Row: Beatrice Higgins, Phillip Barnes, Jean Tubbs, Enzo Monti, Ann Stratton, Francis 

Verre, Ruth Kessler 

December: 

With four official delegates from the S. A. S. and other interested 
members and students, there was a large delegation from Plymouth at the 
convention held in the New Bedford High School. New ideas were obtained 
through discussion and comparison of various school procedures. 

Mr. Frank Dart of Waltham took the identification pictures, which 
were purchased by those pupils who wished them. 

The first issue of a paper called "The Vacuum Cleaner" was circulated 
in the school by its pupil sponsors, and read with much interest by the 
subscribers. 

The Christmas assembly consisted of the Bible reading by Edward 
Wilson, carol singing by a mixed group, and several selections by the orches- 
tra. A dramatization, which was to have been the feature on the program, 



Page 62 




BAND AND DRUM MAJORETTES 
Front Row: Charles Mathewson, Richard Boyer, Donald Besegai, Herbert Kearsley, Robert Silva 
Second Row: Grace Silvia, Donald Lovett, Phillip Loprest'i, Reginald Correa, Robert Querze, Pauline 
Armstrong, Daniel Alves, Russell Chandler, William Hutchinson, Jacqueline DeCarli 



had to be omitted because school was closed the previous day by a storm. 
In the evening the annual Sports Dance was held, sponsored by the 
hockey and football squads. 

January: 

Mrs. Clara Maguire from the Katherine Gibbs school in Boston spoke 
to the seniors and juniors taking the commercial courses. She offered some 
very useful information about procedures to be followed when looking for 
a position. 

A banquet for the hockey and football teams was served in the cafeteria 
by Miss Helen Doherty. Speeches upon the occasion were followed by 
dancing in the gymnasium. "Buddy" Roncarati was named football captain 
for next year. 

In an S. A. S. assembly, Mr. Leon Smith presented a very enjoyable 
program to the school, first showing a movie on chimpanzees and then 
introducing his dog, Suki, who performed many tricks. 

Dr. Merille Tobin, who has travelled extensively all over the world 
and has come in contact with many well-known people, including Mahatma 
Ghandi, talked on his experiences. He pointed out the necessity of getting 
along with people if we are to have a peaceful world. 

Graduation and group pictures were taken by the photographer from 
the Purdy Studio. 

February: 

Mr. Mongan called a brief assembly to remind pupils of the importance 
of a good school record for the term and the remainder of the year. 

A senior class meeting was held to discuss the subjects of flowers and 

Page 63 



in iovjfi 



1. Lovely To See 
Delightful To Hear 

2. Who Done It? 
or 

Fugitives from the Normal 
The Situation Well in Hand 
Lower Left — Jean and the Boys 
5. Reversal's Guiding Light 
A Man and Two Maids 
Sherlock Holmes Monti 
Revolutionary — But Definitely 
The Boss and the Madmen 
Four Hearts? 
Ladies of Grace and Precision 



Ask us 




THEATER 
HOUR 

presented by the 
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 

January 17, 18 - 1946 




dress for graduation. The boys went to Room 10 with Kenneth Telfer in 
charge, and the girls remained in the auditorium with Pauline Zanello 
presiding. 

An assembly commemorating the birthdays of Lincoln and Washington 
was presented to the school under the direction of Miss Iris Albertini. 
Those participating in it were Mordina McClure, Malcolm Lawday, Donald 
Lovett, and Almarie St. George. 

Ruth VanAmburgh was honored as "Best Girl Citizen" in the Class of 
'46. On the same day seniors who had maintained an eighty-five percent 
average or higher for three years were named as members of the Honor 
Group. 

March: 

Seven juniors and three seniors were inducted into the National Honor 
Society, the greatest honor that can be bestowed upon a high school student. 
They were chosen for outstanding qualities of leadership, scholarship, 
character, and service. 

Miss Nellie Locklin officially closed the stamp and bond drive and 
announced that banking was to be renewed. She reported that in three 
and one-half years the school had purchased $20,000 worth of stamps and 
bonds. 

A movie entitled "Typing Tips" was shown to the typists of Plymouth 
High School. 

Mr. Charles Williams and three of his students from the Williams 
Business College in Brockton spoke to the seniors and the commercial 
students on opportunities in the business world. 




HONOR GROUP 

Front Row: Elaine Longhi, Catherine Brigida, Hilda Belcher, Marjorie Radcliffe, Barbara Bagni 
Second Row: Richard Correa, Ruth Van Amburgh, Caroline Trufant, Joan Holmes, Sylvia Bolotin. 

Raymond Girard 
Third Row: Norman Clark, Robert Diegoli. George Marinos, Enzo Monti, Mrs. Miriam Raymond 

Page 66 




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

Front Row: Mary Janeiro, Martha Nelligan, Claire Feinberg, Alice Dugan, Carolyn Wood, Jane 

Hennessey, Thelma Bourne, Mabel Pierce, Gertrude Merritt 
Second Row: Louise Poirier, Gloria Lacey, Ruth Van Amburgh, Marjorie Russell, Katherine Palches, 

Rita Merada, Lois Tassinari, Gloria Maier, Harriet Douglas, Virginia Marois, Lillian Parker 
Third Row: Ruth Kessler, Claire Thurber, Pauline Armstrong, Nancy Smith, Hilda Belcher, Elaine 

Cortelli, Dolores Souza, Arlene Christi, Lillian Sharkey, Christine Axtord 
Fourth Row : Ellen DeCofT, Elinore Shea, Eileen Collari, Marjorie Radcliffe, Joan Holmes, Ann 

Stratton, Marjorie Nickerson, Jean Tubbs, Marion Fortini, Ann Morton, Louise Hand, Constance 

Jenney, Joyce Stanley 




PILGRIM STAFF 

Front Row: Thelma Bourne, Lillian Parker, Robert Silva, Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Marjorie Radcliffe, 

Raymond Girard, Harriet Douglas, Dolores Ghidoni 
Second Row: Elston Bartlett, Eva Paoletti, Katherine Palches, Marjorie Russell, Ruth Van Amburgh, 

Barbara Cavicchi, Christine Axford, Ann Kennedy, Ina Zall, Charles Mathewson 
Third Row: Hilda Belcher, Pauline Armstrong, Catherine Brigida, Ann Stratton, Marjorie Nickerson, 

Joan Holmes, Carolyn Trufant, Sylvia Bolotin 
Fourth Row: Gilbert Silva, George Martin, Harold Young, Francis Verre, Richard Buttner, Robert 

Smiley, Enzo Monti, James Lamborghini, Carlton Boudreau, Walter Correa 

Page -67 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Front Row: Hilda Belcher, Ruth Van Amburgh, Kenneth Telfer, Raymond Girard, Richard Correa, 

Catherine Brigida, Marjorie Radcliffe 
Second Row: Catherine Baratta, Doris Valeriani. Marjorie Nickerson, Pauline Armstrong, Barbara 

Bagni, Sylvia Bolotin, Miss Helen Johnson 
Third Row: Harold Young, Louis Pederzani, George Martin, Walter Morton 




PRESS CLUB 

Front Row: Thelma Bourne, Katherine Palches, Pauline Armstrong, Mrs. Louise Bearse, Gloria 

Lacey, Joyce Stanley 
Second Row: Harriet Douglas, Christine Axlord. Ruth Van Amburgh, Beatrice Higgins, George 

Martin, Mary Drew, Ruth Kessler, Florence Almeida, Gloria Maier 



Page 68 




TEN-CENTS-A-WEEK COLLECTORS 

Pauline Ruffini, Mr. 



Mario Romano, Catherine 



Front Row: Marjorie Radcllffe, Marjorie Russell, 

Brigida, Jane Hennessey, Elaine Cortelli 
Second Row: Walter Correa, Angus McLeod, Henry Mengoli, Francis Verre, Mary Lou Ellis, Harold 

Govoni, Enzo Monti, Louis Pederzani, Dennis Borsari, Leo Jaeger 




STAMP SELLERS 

Front Row: Ruth Van Amburgh. Eva Paoletti, Harriet Douglas, Miriam Holmes, Evelyn Silva, 

Marjorie Morton. Marie Boutin 
Second Row: Ruth Kessler, Eileen Collari, Miss Jeanette Jacques, Miss Katherine Lang, Edna Salmi, 

Dolores Cavalho, Dorothy Dunham 
Third Row: John Ricci, Douglas Thurber, George Avery, John Roy, William Balboni, Donald 

Lovett 

Page 69 




LIBRARY STAFF 

Front Row : Thelma Bourne, Dolores Ghidoni, Lillian Parker, Katherine Palches, Therese Broullard, 

Ruth Van Amburgh, Marjorie Morton, Lydia Motta 
Second Row: Catherine Baratta, Beatrice Higgins, Phyllis McManus, Elston Bartlett, Claire 

Thurber, Pauline Armstrong, Edna Salmi, Virginia Marois 
Third Row: Constance Jenney, Pauline Zanello, Martha Thomas, Carolyn Wood, Elaine Wood, 

Marjorie Radcliffe, Phyllis Rowe 




use your MECHANICAL SKILL 

WITH THE U. S. ARMY ENGINEERS! 

Good jobs are open in the Engineer Corps of the new peacetime 
Regular Army. Men trained as auto mechanics. Diesel operators, 
machinists, carpenters, electricians can enlist now and use their 
skills— learn new trades— with good pay and rapid advancement. 
Technical ratings are open to qualified men. 

You get many advantages never before offered under the 
new Armed Forces Voluntary Recruitment Act: 30 days' paid 
furlough yearly. Family allowances for dependents. An oppor- 
tunity to retire at half pay in 20 years! Enlistment for 3 years 
permits you to choose branch of service and overseas theater. 
Extra pay for overseas duty. Ask for full details today! 

U. S. ARMY RECRUITING STATION 

16 Centre Street, Brockton, Mass. 



Page 70 



In the long run ... 



You and your friends will prize the portrait 
that looks like you — your truest self, free 
from stage effects and little conceits. 

It is in this "long run" photography that 
PURDY success has been won. 

Portraiture by the camera that one cannot 
laugh at or cry over in later years. 

For present pleasure and future pride protect 
your photographic self by having PURDY 
make the portraits. 



PURDY 

160 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 

Official Photographers to 
Plymouth High School Class 1946 



SPECIAL RATES TO P. H. S. STUDENTS 



Nook Farm Dairy 



rALL OF MY 
PUPILS ARE 
MILK -WISE 




ILK 

and 

CREA 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Taste the Difference from a Modern Dairy 



TRY OUR FLAVORED DRINKS 



Chocolate 



Orange 



Coffee 



Nook Road Plymouth 

Telephone, Plymouth 1261 











Compliments of 

L. KNIFE & SON 

HAY — GRAIN — FLOUR 











Best Wishes . . . 



Plymouth 

Machine and Burner 

Corporation 



SCUDDER 

COAL and OIL CO. 

JOHN J. ALSHEIMER, Inc. 



FAMOUS READING ANTHRACITE 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



To the Class of 1946 



VERY BEST WISHES 

for a 

SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 



OLD COLONY 
and PLYMOUTH 

THEATRES 



PRIMO'S SERVICE STATION 

PRIMO ZUCCHELLI 
Tel. Plymouth 79 

Corner of Sandwich and South Streets 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



CAPPANNARI BROTHERS 



Compliments of 

VOLTA RECORD SHOP 



Congratulations, Class of 1946 

WALTER S. PEARSON 

JEWELER 



62 Court St. 



Plymouth 



STODDARD & TALBOT 

Insurance That Insures 

Fire, Automobile, Burglary, 
Plate Glass 

And All Other Types of Insurance 



36 Main St. 



Tel. 30 



Plymouth 



PLYMOUTH ROCK 
HARDWARE CO. 

Telephone 950 
62 Court St. Plymouth 



SHERMAN'S 

PLYMOUTH 
NORTH PLYMOUTH 



COLONIAL 
DINER 



TOWN BROOK 
Service Station 



Lubrication 



Vulcanizing 



REPAIRING 
24-HOUR SERVICE 

Telephone 820-W 



Best Wishes of 



FOREST DRUG STORE 



22 Court St. Plymouth 

Telephone 358 



Best Wishes 

TAVERNELLI'S 
Barber Shop 

Opposite Buick Garage 



FOR GIRLS 
ABOUT TO 
GRADUATE 




(Opportunities now for 

IMPORTANT PUBLIC SERVICE 

For girls who want more than "just a job," and 
who are eager for an interesting career in 
public service, there are opportunities now 
with the New England Telephone Company. 

You'll find the surroundings pleasant; your 
co-workers congenial. And you'll get training 
that will always be valuable. 

Girls of the Senior Class should investigate 
this opportunity. Training courses may be ar- 
ranged so as not to interfere with studies and 
can usually be given right in the home town. 

Your teacher or vocational advisor can tell 
you more about work in this interesting industry. 



NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY 



'Entrance 

to 

Morton 

Park" 




SCENES 

OF 

PLYMOUTH, 

MASS. 



Plymouth Savings Bank 



Incorporated 1828 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



p 



EACE WAS ACHIEVED BY 



COURAGE, SACRIFICE AND 
PRODUCTION. IT MUST BE 
PRESERVED BY INDUSTRY, 
HONESTY AND INTEGRITY. 




- -^ ^ ,ff 



Plymouth Cordage Company 

Plymouth, Massachusetts 




Ice Cream 



Favorably Known for 55 Years 
and Still in a Class by Itself 

"Made in Milton for Particular People" 
131 Elioi Street Milton 87, Mass. 

BLUe Hills 7850 

10 1 2 Nelson Street Plymouth, Mass. 

Plymouth 160 



Best Wishes from 

THE ARTHUR L. ELLIS DIVISION 

Fisher Manufacturing Company, Inc. 



"CAPE COD" CURTAINS 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Plymouth Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 



Incorporated 1882 


Federalized 1937 


JAMES R. CHANDLER 


ROBERT J. TUBES 


President 


Vice-President - Treasurer 




WALDER J. ENGSTROM 




Secretary and Assistant Treasurer 



Par* ot 

All you Earn 

is Yours to 




Give yourself a 
longc/i share of 
the good things 



1 111 MtKiurJ 



part of your earn- 
ings Jor later ute 




*l.00 opens 

your account. 

liberal earnings are added 



Call or Write for Information 



44 Main Street 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Tel. 324 



Best wishes to the 
graduating Class of 

1946 



C V> 



$b$2S& 



6 - 8 Court St. 



Stevens 



the Florist 



Flowers for All Occasions 

MEMBER 
Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 



NINE COURT STREET 



Best Wishes to the Class of '46 

BAILEY MOTOR SALES, Inc. 

Telephone 1090 

BUICK and PONTIAC Sales and Service 
G.M.C. TRUCK Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade . . . One of the best equipped 

service stations in the vicinity . . . Agents for 

Delco Batteries and United States Tires. 



Don't Forget: All of Our Repair Work is Guaranteed 



114 Sandwich Street PLYMOUTH, MASS. 




Will there be a NEW HOME in YOUR future? 

There can be, sooner than you imagine possible, if your plans 
include a monthly direct-reduction mortgage loan. 



The fairest and cheapest home loans 
are "direct-reduction"— as granted at 
this bank. Interest computed each 
month reduces with the principal. 
This modern way you never are 
charged interest on money you have 
already repaid. If you plan to buy 
or build, count on our 91 years of 
experience in home-financing to 
help show you the quicker way to 
ownership. 




FIVE CENTS 
SAVINGS BANK 

INCORPORATED /6SS 

PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

HENRY'S FURNITURE CO. 

HENRY BUSI, Prop. 

40 Court Street 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Tel. 1118 


SOUTH CENTRE 
MARKET 

9 Market Street 

Tel. 400 Tel. 1670 


©li (Enlnttg ffilaimiry 

Laundry Service 

Convenient, Economical 
Tel. 272 Howland St. 


We Put 
NEW LIFE in OLD SHOES 

PLYMOUTH 
SHOE HOSPITAL 

63 '/ 2 Main St. Plymouth 


WALK-OVER 
Shoe Store 

Agents for 
WALK-OVER SHOES 

Bass Moccasins Kamp Tramps 

Arnold and Stetson Shoes 

Physical Culture Shoes 

Hill and Dale Shoes 

D. W. BESSE, Proprietor 

65 Main St. Plymouth 


MITCHELL - THOMAS CO. 

INC. 

FURNITURE 
Wallpaper, Paints 

66 Court St. Plymouth 


CROWELL'S 
FURNISHINGS 

— FOR — 
WOMEN and CHILDREN 


McLELLAN'S 

Quality Merchandise 

at Low Prices 

PLYMOUTH 



BANDER'S 

Plymouth's Most Popular Shop for 

MISSES AND WOMEN 



54 Main St. 



Plymouth 



Tel. 38 



The 
COOPER DRUG CO. 

DRUGS 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

SHIRLEY SQUARE 
TOWN SQUARE 



BALBONI'S DRUG STORE 

JOSEPH BALBONI, Reg. Pharm. 



317 Court Street 
NO. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



KAY'S CUT-RATE 

Lowest Prices in Town 

PATENT MEDICINES 
COSMETICS 



CURRIER'S 

RESTAURANT 

and 

ICE CREAM SHOP 

WHITMAN and KEMP PRODUCTS 



63 Main St. 



Plymouth 



Corner North St. 



67 Main St. 



SIBLEY'S SHOE STORE 

Exclusive Agents in Plymouth for 

AIR- STEP Shoes for Women 

ROBLEE Shoes for Men 

BUSTER BROWN SHOES for 

Boys and Girls 

// It's New, It's at Sibley's 
11 Court Street 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
Specialties 

1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 

Telephone 1298-W 

Compliments of 

MIDDLE STREET 
GARAGE 



Our Congratulations 
to the Class of 



1946 



PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

"Modern Store For Men and Boys" 

AND 

PURITAN TAILORING DEPT. 

56 Main Street, Plymouth 



E. CAVICCHI and SONS 

FRUIT AND PRODUCE 

296 Court Street Tel. 1190 NO. PLYMOUTH 

THOMAS R. HOGAN 

FORMERLY 

CUSHING'S 



BRENTWOOD SPORTSWEAR MALLORY HATS 

PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WILLIAM CAVICCHI, Proprietor 

Telephone 341 18 Main Street 

MANHATTAN SHIRTS LEOPOLD MORSE CLOTHES 

ALPHONSO'S AUTO BODY 

R. GALLERANI M. TRAVERSO 

BEAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

Body and Fender Work — Guaranteed 

51 Samoset Street PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone 300 

BLISS HARDWARE CO. 

PLUMBING Sheet Metal Work HEATING 

Plumbing Supplies, Fertilizers, Garden Tools, Builders' Hardware, 
Wall Papers, Paints, Pittsburgh Plate Glass; Locksmiths 

Opp. Old Colony Theatre Tel. 825 PLYMOUTH 

Evening Appointments Accepted Phone Connection 

Machineless Permanents $5.50 and up 
"Feather Cut" Shampoo and Wave $1.50 

The "Little" Beauty Shop 

MARION ZANDI PRATT, Proprietor 
over 5 years experience 

Off Bay View Avenue 1 Maple Place 



cJhe Lrlyrnouth I iattonal \Joank 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 




CHECKING ACCOUNTS 

Commercial Personal "Checkmaster" 

BUSINESS and PERSONAL LOANS 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 

American Express Travellers Checks 



1846 



1946 



H. P. HOOD & SONS 



Dairy Products 



"One Hundred Years' Experience to Help Serve You Better' 



650 Plymouth St. 



East Bridgewater, Mass. 



Phone E. B. 45 



For the Graduation Gift, give a 

fine WATCH or RING 

We carry a complete line of Nationally -Advertised Watches 

BULOVA, BENRUS, ELGIN, GKUEN, HAMILTON, WITTNAUER, 
WALTHAM and LONGINES 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings Pen and Pencil Sets 

IDENTIFICATION BRACELETS TIE AND COLLAR SETS BILLFOLDS 

LOCKETS, CROSSES, BRACELETS, ROSARIES, TOILET SETS 



^iter 



jewelryX /company 

.^^ / / /X/\\ \w^ 

25 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 65 



HENRY MENGOLl & SON 
Plumbing and Heating Contractors 

AIR CONDITIONING 
Delco Oil Burners 



Compliments of 

ALVES SHOE STORE 

Tel. 441 303 Court St. 

LEONORE'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

46 Main St. Plymouth 

Telephone 1116-W 

GAMBINI'S 

Air-Conditioned 

LUNCHEONETTE 



Tel. 372 



52 Main St. 



RUTH MORGAN, M.A. 
Educational Advisor 

751 Little Building- 
Boston, Mass. 
Liberty 7171 

No Service Charge to Client 

LEWIS' 

DRYGOODS, WALLPAPERS 
KYANIZE PAINTS 



13 Court St. 



Plymouth 



Compliments of 

GRAY, THE CLEANER 



Phone 406 

Hours Every Afternoon Except Wednesday 
1 :30 to 5 :00 

DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 
Russell Bldg. Plymouth 

STEIN'S 
FURNITURE STORE 



Tel. 679 
291-295 Court St. 



DR. JOSEPH W. WILD 
DR. GEORGE S. WILD 

OPTOMETRISTS 



12 Main St. 



Tel. 658 



Plymouth 



WOOD'S FISH MARKET 

Telephone 261 
Main St. Ext. Plymouth 

BILLY WALSH'S MARKET 

The Home of 
REFRIGERATIVE VEGETABLES 



Tel. 1259 



54 COURT ST. 



VERRE'S BARBER SHOP 

Hours: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
52 Sandwich St. Plymouth 



DR. A. L. DOUGLAS 



PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

Plumbing, Heating 

Paint and Hardware Supplies 
Tel. 1423 39 Court St. 

DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 
THE ENTIRE FAMILY 



Tel. 165-W 



16 Court St. 



Plymouth 



C L O U G H'S 

The Complete 

FOOD MARKET 
Tel. 459 84 Summer St. 



C^ooa/ 

Jeweler 



ng 



Established 1802 

DIAMONDS WATCHES JEWELRY 

Sterling Silver, Electrical Appliances 
Clocks, and Gifts 

EXPERT CLOCK and WATCH REPAIRING 
Lenses Replaced, Glasses Frames 

Telephone 429 4 Main Street 

PLYMOUTH 

JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 121 Years 

PAINT HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES HARDWARE 

Plumbing and Heating Supplies 

1 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 283 

CECCARELLI 

CUSTOM TAILORS 

CLEANSERS FURRIERS 

We operate our own Cleansing Plant on Premises 
WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 

301 Court Street Tel. 941 NO. PLYMOUTH 



BROCKTON 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 


JIM'S RESTAURANT 

INCORPORATED 


GEORGE E. BIGELOW, Principal 




Send for Illustrated 35th Year Catalogue 


Fine Foods Our Specialty 


Enrollment Limited Due To Veterans 




226 Main St., Brockton 1, Mass. 


7 Main Street Plymouth 


Brockton 635 


Telephone 1187-VV 


Ben R. Resnlck Robert' S. Resnlck 




BEN R. RESNICK CO. 


Compliments of 


Distributors of 




REPLACEMENT PARTS 


MAROIS MARKET 


Summer and High Sts. Plymouth 




Tel. 697-698 




CONTENTED 


Compliments of 


Shoe Store 






SEARS ROEBUCK & CO. 


SUNDIAL SHOES 






ORDER OFFICE 


For All The Family 




CRANSHAW'S 




Radio Service 


Compliments of 


Tubes RADIO Batteries 
SUPPLIES 


MARTS BEAUTY SHOP 


Pick-up and Delivery 


Tel. 1128 17 Leyden Street 


56 Court Street Plymouth 





JLort 



ng s 

Jewelers 



28 Main St. 



Plymouth 



Cape Insurance Agency 

Amedeo V. Sgarzi Orfeo H. Sgarzi 

Enrico Ferrari 

INSURANCE 
for Everything Insurable 



THE VIOLIN SHOP 



— OF — 



ROGER S. KELLEN 



SEARS FUEL CO. 

Coke — COAL — Charcoal 
Range and Fuel Oil 

Tel. 1214-W 
Lothrop St. Plymouth 

Plymouth & Brockton 
Street Railway Co. 

Ride Our Modern 
Air-Conditioned Buses 



4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 




Telephone 66 


Sandwich St. Plymouth 


C. PAUL 


Good Quality at Just Prices 


For Your 


KNIFE'S 


SHOES and REPAIRING 

HONEST VALUES 
DEPENDABLE SERVICE 


Groceries Meats 
Vegetables Fruits 


53 Court St. Plymouth 


293 Court St. Plymouth 




Telephone 1286 



ZANELLO 
FURNITURE CO. 

QUALITY FURNITURE 
Upholstering Bedding 

Norge — Gibson — Croslev Refrigerators 
Tel. 1485 85 Court St. 



THE ROGERS PRINT 



Printers and Producers of 



Preferred Printing 



20 Middle Street Plymouth 



Phone 165-M 



CANTONI COAL CO. 



Coal — Oil 



HEATING EQUIPMENT 



'blue coal" Dealer 



Tel. 1233-R 



Hedge Rd. 



Compliments of 

PROGRESSIVE 
MARKET 



Best Wishes from 



Old Colony Dairy Bar 



Clothes for All Occasions 

SPORT COATS SUITS 

SPORT SLACKS WHITE FLANNELS 

SWEATERS SHIRTS 

TIES HOSIERY 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 

Court Street PLYMOUTH 



Compliments of 

W. T. GRANT CO. 

2 Court St., Plymouth 

Compliments of 

SAMOSET MARKET 



PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO, 

Building Materials of All Kinds 

Telephone 237 



PETROLEUM SALES and SERVICE, Inc. 

Agents for 

FILTERED RANGE and FUEL OILS WHITE FLASH GASOLINE 

ATLANTIC HIGH FILM STRENGTH MOTOR OILS 



Hedge Road 



PLYMOUTH 



Telephone Plymouth 1499 



Compliments of 



EDES MANUFACTURING CO. 



Compliments of 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 



16 Market St. 



Plymouth 



Elmer E. Avery 
Insurance Agency Inc. 

Est. Since 1905 

Fire, Liability, Accident, 
Automobile 

INSURANCE, SURETY BONDS 

16 Main St. Plymouth 

Tel. 166-W 



MARVELLI'S 
News Stand 



299 Court St. 



No. Plymouth 



SILVIO LEONARDI 



Pioneer Food Store 



298 Court St. Plymouth 

Telephone 53 



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i Do Your Letterheads 



properly reflect the quality of your products or 
services? 

We will gladly give you the benefit of our long experi- 
ence in producing high quality business stationery. 



Phone: Plymouth 77 




THE MEMORIAL PRESS 

Largest Printing Plant in Southeastern Massachusetts 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

WE ARE KNOWN AS PRINTERS WHO PRODUCE 



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Best Wishes to the Qraduates 

of 
PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 



CAPITOL ENGRAVING COMPANY 

286 Congress St. BOSTON, MASS. 

QUALITY ENGRAVING PLATES 
For Black and White or Color Reproductions 



PRISCILLA GRILL 
Pizza Our Specialty 

301 V 2 Court St. 
NORTH PLYMOUTH 


Compliments of 

Plymouth Bottling Works 

Phone 1623-W 124 Sandwich St. 


PLYMOUTH TAXI CO. 
1070-W— 1070-Y 

Day and Night Service 
Office: MAIN STREET EXT. 


Best Wishes to the 
GRADUATING CLASS 

A Friend 



Enna Jettick Shoes 



Little Student Shoes 



EDDIE'S SHOE STORE 

E. HAND, Proprietor 
18 Main Street Tel. 158 PLYMOUTH 

THE FAMILY SHOE STORE 

A-Z Comfort Shoes A-Z Comfort Slippers 

The Best Frappes in Town Plenty of Good Pop-Corn 
OUR SUNDAES CAN'T BE BEAT 

— AT — 

THE MANHATTAN GROCERY 

GEORGE D. MAYERS, Prop. 

Telephone 106-8 

58 Sandwich Street PLYMOUTH 

"That Distinctive Store of Plymouth" 

GEORGE V. BUTTNER STORE 

Plymouth's Most Modern Store 

For Ladies, Misses and Children 

Featuring SPORTSWEAR 
Telephone 290 19-21 Court Street 



AUTO SUPPLIES 



BICYCLES 



WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE STORE 

C. W. FOWLER (Owner) 

10 Main Street, PLYMOUTH. MASS. 



TRUETONE RADIOS 



DAVIS TIRES 



S A DOCS 

/ashion (enter 

Shows the newest in 
Misses' and Women's Wear 


Greeting, Best Wishes, and Success to all 
Plymouth High School Graduates! 

PLYMOUTH ROCK JOINT BOARD 

Textile Workers Union of America, CIO 

LAWRENCE MOSSEY, President WILLIAM HARPER, Vice-President 

ARRIGO FERIOLI, Recording Secretary 

WILLIAM J. BOWES, Manager 


DR. WILLIAM O. DYER 


THE SHIRETOWN PRESS 

HARRY H. ROWE, Prop. 

"Makers of Good Impressions" 
17 Pleasant Street Plymouth 


WILLIAM DiMARZIO 
Insurance 

1 Court St. Plymouth 

Phone Plymouth 440; Res. 1582 


ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 
Beauty Shop 

Room 10 Buttner Building 
PLYMOUTH 


SARACCA'S 
News Stand 

36 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


It it's New and Smart you'll find it at 

SYLVIA'S 
MILLINERY SHOP 

Handbags, Hosiery, Costume Jewelry 
20 Court Street Plymouth 


DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 


The co-operation of the Advertisers 
is deeply appreciated by the Staff. 



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